Human-Trafficking-Guide-OPIA-2017.pdf - Combatting Human Trafficking A Career Guide for Lawyers and Law Students Prepared by the Bernard Koteen Office

Human-Trafficking-Guide-OPIA-2017.pdf - Combatting Human...

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1 Combatting Human Trafficking A Career Guide for Lawyers and Law Students Prepared by the Bernard Koteen Office of Public Interest Advising at Harvard Law School (OPIA) Summer 2017 Written by: Rebecca Harris, OPIA Summer Fellow 2015 Daniella Goncalves, OPIA Summer Fellow 2016 Edited by: Alexa Shabecoff, Assistant Dean for Public Service Ginny Greiman, Attorney Advisor Isabel Martin, OPIA Summer Fellow 2017
2 Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Background on the Field A. Philosophical Differences in the Field B. Overlap with Other Issues and Legal Areas III. Practice SettingsA.Governmental and Intergovernmental Opportunities B.Opportunities at Non-Governmental Organizations IV. Work Types A.Domestic Work Types B. International Work Types V. Career Advice A. Skills and Experience B. Choosing and Pursuing a Career Path VI. Personal Narratives VII. Selected Resources Programs at HLS Course Listings Organizations Recommended Readings and References
3 Acknowledgement This guide would not have been possible without the valuable insights of several people. Many thanks to Kristen Abrams, Hilary Axam, Christina Bain, Reynaldo Bicol, Jayne Bigelsen, Alan Howard, Ann Johnson, Stacie Jonas, Barbara A. Martinez, Anna Martinez, Kate Mogulescu, Victoria Wisniewski Otero, Marissa Ram, Stephanie Richard, Rebecca Rittenhouse, Jeanne Smoot, Julie Su, Martina Vandenberg, Jill Coster van Voorhout, and Viviana Waisman for their willingness to speak about their work; Judith Murciano her knowledge on fellowships; Ginny Greiman for her assistance with editing; and Alexa Shabecoff for her vision and guidance on this project. I. Introduction Recognizing human trafficking as an affront to human dignity, both national and global leaders have called for stronger efforts to combat the crime and support trafficking survivors. It ought to concern every person,President Barack Obama said at the launching of a new federal anti-trafficking campaign in 2012, because its a debasement of our common humanity.1Likewise, UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson has stated that we must take action on all fronts: criminal justice, victim assistance and victim protection, human rights, migration policy and labor market regulation.2In fact, attorneys cantake on human trafficking from any of these angles. Lawyers have used both criminal law and employment regulations to bring traffickers to justice. To aid survivors and safeguard their rights, lawyers have forced traffickers to compensate their victims, fought charges leveled against women and children forced into prostitution, and secured legal status for people brought to this country against their will. Both at home and abroad, American attorneys have also advocated for a more comprehensive, consistent government response to human trafficking in all its forms.

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