Afam 101 July 12

Afam 101 July 12 - Afam 101 July 12, 2007 William Henry...

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Afam 101 July 12, 2007 William Henry Singleton - William was sold at the age of 4 - The slave owners offered candy and then enslaved him as a little boy and then he moved down to Atlanta - He caught a ride as an 8 year old from a white lady - She didn’t actively help him - She didn’t turn him in and they never spoke - He went back to New Bern to be with his family - When he first runs into them they don’t recognize him - They only do after they see a burn on his back - He negotiates with his owner - The owner has to give in to the enslaved kid which is rare at the time - He is very willful and resistant to slavery - Literacy was generally a form of resistance - It would allow mass communication, you can forge passes, you can see what is going on in the newspapers, it can undermine the ideology of slavery since blacks were supposed to be too dumb to read - Children were taught by their parents how to be slaves - Artisan slaves were the most valuable - If they had skills then they were the most valuable
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course AFAM 101 taught by Professor Mcmillan during the Summer '07 term at UNC.

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Afam 101 July 12 - Afam 101 July 12, 2007 William Henry...

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