Syllabus - FMA1172 Course Instructor Dr Chris Cagle...

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Unformatted text preview: FMA1172 Course Instructor: Dr. Chris Cagle Introduction to Film and Video Analysis Office: Film & Media Arts, Annenberg 132 Fall 2007 Phone: 1-4812 / Email: [email protected] Lecture and screening time: Mondays, 1:40-4:30 Office Hours: M 11-noon; Tu 2-4 PM or by appt Discussion time by section: sec. 1: F 1.40-2.30 AH 3, section instructor Jason Coyle sec. 2: F 2.40-3.30 AH 3, section instructor Laura Deutch sec. 3: F 3.40-4.30 AH 3, section instructor Ted Nanniceli sec. 4: F 3.40-4.30 AH 304, section instructor Luce Lincoln Additional screening time (recommended): Mondays, 5:00-7:00 TU101 Fridays, 10:30-12:30 AH3 REQUIRED TEXT Maria Pramaggiore and Tom Wallis, Film: A Critical Introduction 2nd edition (FCI, for short, below) Other readings listed are from the supplemental readings, to be posted on Blackboard OVERVIEW What does it mean to "read" a film or video? How can we analyze moving image media in the manner that we interpret literary texts or appreciate form in fine arts? What are the differences between film, video and these older media? How does film communicate meaning? This course introduces basic analytical tools and concepts to begin to answer these questions. It surveys the broad artistic, social and political dimensions of the cinema, with some attention to newer moving image media. While not a historical survey or a film appreciation course of great "masterworks," screenings will be inclusive and broad, pulling examples from across historical eras, genres and national contexts. Whether challenging or entertaining, high art or popular culture, the examples will illustrate the nature and breadth of cinematic and video expression. Not all films and screenings will appeal to everyone or be equally entertaining, so students should approach all screenings with an open mind and a scholarly curiosity. See the final page of this syllabus for details on screenings and required viewing for this course. OBJECTIVES AND GRADING By the end of this course, students should gain the following abilities: • Thorough knowledge of basic terminology of film form • Ability to give a strong, original interpretive reading of a film • Facility in writing a well-organized analytical paper • Adeptness in recognizing formal elements in a screened film or video The grading will measure how well the above objectives are met. Median grades for the class will be in the C range. This represents average work that fulfills assignments as specified and shows knowledge of the material. B and A grades will be rewarded for work that goes beyond basic requirements, shows mastery of the course’s concepts, and demonstrates student originality of thought. Similarly, below average work, or work that fails to address the assignment’s specifications will receive a D or failing grade, as appropriate. Incompletes will be given only in the most extreme extenuating circumstances. Here is the breakdown of how grades are calculated: Quizzes/Journals/Misc. 15% Section participation...
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Syllabus - FMA1172 Course Instructor Dr Chris Cagle...

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