LEG320week7assignment2 - RUNNING HEAD CRIMINAL DEFENSES AND PUNISHMENTS Assignment 2 Criminal Defenses and Criminal Punishments Brenda Brown LEG

LEG320week7assignment2 - RUNNING HEAD CRIMINAL...

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RUNNING HEAD: CRIMINAL DEFENSES AND PUNISHMENTS 1 Assignment 2: Criminal Defenses and Criminal Punishments Brenda Brown LEG 320 Lateefah Muhammad Strayer University November 19, 2017
CRIMINAL DEFENSES AND CRIMINAL PUNISHMENT 2 When determining whether or not the use of force is lawful or not, there are many things to consider. There have been many controversial issues that pertain to the correct use of force by police officials. Many of this occurrences have made the public eye. The most controversial thing in this issues were that police were allegedly using excessive force to contain suspects of crime. The force of use have been the focus of these publicized events. As you may know, there are no guidelines to follow when determining the amount of force to use, but police officers are trained to use their best professional judgment when utilizing force to apprehend a suspect. The court is left to determine whether or not excessive force was used. There are key points the courts consider when making this determination of lawfulness and they are: the “stand your ground law, self-defense, and/ or the good Samaritan law. Self-defense is one of the many key points that is used when determining the lawfulness of using excessive force in any case. Self-defense is defined as the actual right to prevent suffering force or violence through the use of sufficient level of counteracting force or violence (Leisring, 2016). Self-defense is self-explanatory in regards to the fact of it containing the right to defend oneself, the lawfulness of the actions of other people involved, and the level- headedness of the act of self-defense. Each of the components of self-defense contain an equal level of reasonable neutrality. This is a fact, to me, because each individual involved is considered. Two people may have potentially conflicting rights to self-defense, but innate right does not give anyone a right to interfere with the person of another except to protect his or her own person (Ripstein, 2009).

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