week9-2.pdf - 04_kim_058344(jk-t 1:56 pm Page 445 ARTICLE INTERNATIONAL journal of CULTURAL studies Copyright \u00a9 2005 SAGE Publications London Thousand

week9-2.pdf - 04_kim_058344(jk-t 1:56 pm Page 445 ARTICLE...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 19 pages.

A R T I C L E INTERNATIONAL journal of CULTURAL studies Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi Volume 8(4): 445–463 DOI: 10.1177/1367877905058344 Experiencing globalization Global TV, reflexivity and the lives of young Korean women Youna Kim London School of Economics and Political Science, England A B S T R A C T Based on ethnographic research in South Korea, this article aims to detail the specific ways in which the cultural experience of globalization impinges upon, and becomes integrated into, the changing lives of young women of different classes. The central arguments revolve around the significance of reflexivity: global TV, in particular, helps to create an important condition for the practice of reflexivity, by opening up a rare space where Korean women can make sense of their life conditions in highly critical ways and can imagine new possibilities of freedom – social mobility and individualization – within the multiple constraints of their social context. The imagination of freedom is however bounded by the pervasive main concept governed by local rules – sexual morality – which means young women’s lives are made and remade through the dialectical negotiation between the locally governed rules and the globally defined fields of possibility. K E Y W O R D S experience global TV globalization reflexivity young Korean women Globalization isn’t only about what is ‘out there,’ remote and far away from the indi- vidual. It is an ‘in here’ phenomenon too, influencing intimate and personal aspects of our lives. (Giddens, 1999: 12) Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres – technological, economic,
Image of page 1
446 political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. It has been variously conceived as time-space compression (referring to the way in which instan- taneous electronic communication erodes the constraints of distance and time on social organization and interaction); accelerating interconnected- ness (understood as the intensification of worldwide social relations and consciousness of world society); and action at a distance (whereby the actions of social agents in one locale can come to have significant conse- quences for ‘distant others’). Globalization thus suggests the expanding scale, speeding up and deepening impact of interregional flows and patterns of social interaction (Held and McGrew, 2003). It has been influenced above all by developments in systems of communication (Giddens, 1999: 10); there is no globalization without communications media. Contempor- ary individuals, subject to an extraordinary diversity of information and communication, can be influenced by images, concepts and lifestyles from well beyond their immediate locales. Globalization affects the basic identi- ties of individuals who now live with a partial and precarious integration of the multiple dimensions of cultural referents (Castells, 1997), and as
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 19 pages?

  • One '19
  • Kim ●, L journal of C

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture