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Privacy: Recognition of a Consumer Right Author(s): Cathy Goodwin Source: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Spring, 1991), pp. 149-166 Published by: Sage Publications, Inc. Stable URL: Accessed: 23-05-2019 08:24 UTC JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at Sage Publications, Inc. is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal of Public Policy & Marketing This content downloaded from 128.250.0.216 on Thu, 23 May 2019 08:24:23 UTC All use subject to
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Privacy: Recognition of a Consumer Right Cathy Goodwin The author thanks MICHAEL MAZIS for detailed comments and encour- agement throughout the project. The author also thanks JAMES KEL- LARIS, ROBERT ROGERS and IVAN Ross for comments on the man- uscript. Support was provided by the School of Management of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and the Interlibrary Loan program of the Rasmuson Library. This paper presents an overview of consumer privacy that integrates the public policy and be- havioral literatures. Consumer privacy is defined in terms of control over information disclo- sure and the environment in which a consumer transaction occurs. These two dimensions generate a 2x2 matrix, identifying four states of privacy based on control over environment, information disclosure, both, or neither. For each state, managerial and policy implications can be derived. Government, industry, and academic sources suggest that consumer privacy has become a critical public policy topic. Bonnie Guiton, special advisor to the presi- dent for consumer affairs and director of the U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs, recently cited privacy as one of three major issues for consumers of the 1990s [Dlabay 1990]. The issue was identified as "major challenge of the 1990s" by an officer of the Direct Marketing Association (Barton 1989). A professor of com- munications noted: "When I first wrote lectures for a university course called 'Communication Law,' I gave only routine attention to privacy, as compared to what I thought were more important- and, frankly, more interesting-topics. Today, the course risks being dominated by pri- vacy. It has become an important and interesting topic" [Hixson 1987, p. xiv]. Despite the growing importance of this topic, research has been extremely lim- ited [cf. Baker et al. 1986; McCrohan 1989]. This paper undertakes an integrative literature review to identify critical issues, proposing a theoretical framework with research implications.
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