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Jordan FrazierEngl21326/28/2019Final Research EssayUnit 4: Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson: Both An AuthorFor Periods of Romanticism And Naturalism When it comes to literature by Emily Dickinson many see her adversity to challenge the religious, social, and economic forces of her time. Often marked as a romanticism writer, she is known for questioning the reality of her situation and finding the connection with exhausting one's individuality in comparison to natures quest for immortality (life after death, living a life Karma free). And because of her fixation on the idea of individuality is in connection with spirituality as a conscious choice, authors and audiences tend to overlook how she can easily relate to the authors of the naturalism period as well. In many of her poems, Dickinson realizes that those who live a well off life in her community only do so because of whom they are related to, or married too. Thus, she believes that it takes scientific principles to prove that those below these individuals do not deserve the same opportunities as the higher up. And the definition of American Naturalism attempts to apply scientific principles of objectivity and detachment to its study of human beings. Dickinson is known for questioning the intention of religion and how people use it to control others and is often arguing against the latter with proof of the beauty in nature and the faults in human choice. Consider her poems “Heavenly Father,”and “Apparently With No Surprise,” in which author and researcher Richard E Brantley analyzes to support his belief that Dickinson uses scientific evidence to prove that no person is more God-worthy than another, by simply relying on the resources of the Bible. Brantley discusses how Dickinson believes that God only “[has]
prejudgment of human beings as guilt-ridden dust (Gen 3:19), worms (Job 25:2-6), and embodiments of sin or depravity (Exod 20:5),” (Brantley 160). This quotation is a direct realization for Dickinson that there is no separation of individuals based on their status of wealth,but instead on their status of morals which goes completely against the social status of what people in her Calvinist colony believe in. In fact, it is important to note the historical background of poet Emily Dickinson, to fully understand why she has a questioning relationship with religion in her literature. To begin, in the source Writing The Nation, which is the class textbook used for e-core, it is stated by authors that Emily Dickinson struggled with acceptance into her society. "Born into an influential and socially prominent New England family in 1830, Emily Dickinson benefited from a level of education and mobility that most of her contemporaries, female and male, could not comprehend," (Berke, 48). In the Pennsylvania Calvinist community, she was raised upon, it was very uncommon and unacceptable for women to take a liking or interest in formal education.

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