Group 52 (2017) Marked-2.pdf

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COURT VISIT REPORT GPR 100: LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING 28/40 Presentation could have benefitted from use of graphs and or pie charts While there was mention of interviews which is important, there is lack of clarity on who was interviewed and the capture of those views is fussy. SUBMITTED BY: MUNYWOKI SHADRACH MASAKU G34/46149/2017 _______________________ MAINA BENSON MUCHEMI G34/46197/2017 ________________________ NYAGAKA DERIUS KOMBO G34/46042/2017 ________________________ NYAGUTHII PATRICIA MUTHONI G34/45670/2017 ________________________ NGURU ERIC MUNENE G34/45949/2017 ________________________ Formatted: Left, Tab stops: 0.63", Left
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NEVILLE LEMEIN G34/46183/2017 ________________________ NDUNGU JAMES MBUTHIA G34/ 45904/2017 ________________________ NYAGA LORNAH KANANA G34/46108/2017 ________________________ Submitted for examination purposes for the course Legal Research and Writing in partial fulfillment for the award of a Bachelor’s degree in Law
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iii Acknowledgments We acknowledge the effort made by the group members who set aside time out of their busy schedules to attend court and keenly listened to all proceedings. Their resilience has made the compilation of this report easy and worthwhile. We would also like to extend our sincere gratitude to our Legal Research and Writing lecturers, Mrs. Florence Jaoko, Ms. Nkatha, Ms. Edna Odhiambo and Ms. Mary Ongore for being the guide that was so needed. We also would like to register our appreciation to the very friendly and welcoming court officials especially in Makadara where we were offered a cup of tea. Above all, we appreciate the Almighty God from whom we draw strength, power and wisdom on a daily basis.
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iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ......................................................................................................................................... III INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................................... 1 PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................................................................. 3 O BSERVATION ............................................................................................................................................................. 3 U SE OF S ECONDARY S OURCES .................................................................................................................................... 3 I NTERVIEWS ................................................................................................................................................................ 3 FINDINGS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 3 M AJOR O FFENCES ....................................................................................................................................................... 4 Prevalent Cases ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 Prevalent Case Outcomes ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Bail and Fines ........................................................................................................................................................ 5 Ruling and Sentencing ........................................................................................................................................... 5 M INOR O FFENCES ....................................................................................................................................................... 5 Prevalent Cases ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 Prevalent Case Outcomes ...................................................................................................................................... 6 Bails and Fines ...................................................................................................................................................... 6 Ruling and Sentencing ........................................................................................................................................... 6 A RE A CCUSED P ERSONS R EPRESENTED BY L AWYERS ................................................................................................ 6 I S THE DUE PROCESS BEING FOLLOWED ? ..................................................................................................................... 7 P LEAS .......................................................................................................................................................................... 7 N EUTRALITY OF THE J UDGE S ...................................................................................................................................... 7 B ONDS AND F INES ....................................................................................................................................................... 8 C HALLENGES F ACING THE C OURTS ............................................................................................................................ 8 O BSTACLES TO J USTICE .............................................................................................................................................. 9 DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS ..................................................................................................................................... 9 CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ...................................................................................................... 10 Deleted: II Deleted: 4 Deleted: 4 Deleted: 5 Deleted: 5 Deleted: 6 Deleted: 6 Deleted: 7 Deleted: 7 Deleted: 8 Deleted: 9
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v BIBLIOGRAPHY ....................................................................................................................................................... 13 Deleted: 12
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1 Introduction Kenya is a democratic nation that follows rules and procedures set about by the constitution, which is the supreme law of the land according to Article 2(1) 1 of the constitution. One of the arms of government is the judiciary which is charged with the responsibility of interpreting the law. According to Article 159(1) 2 , the authority of the judiciary is derived from the people of Kenya and shall be exercised by the courts or tribunals which are set by the constitution. The constitution also provides the hierarchy of courts. Courts in different levels on the hierarchy perform different functions have different jurisdictions. The Supreme Court is the highest court. In order to understand how courts work, the group visited the Makadara Law Courts and attended sessions on Court 2 and Court 3 on 17 th May 2017. They also visited the Kibera Law Courts on 24
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  • Spring '16
  • Bench, Makadara Law Courts

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