Ben Franklin in Leadership , Liberalism , and Social Justice

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University of Michigan Press Chapter Title: Narratives of Intervention: Leadership, Liberalism, and Social Justice Book Title: The Distinction of Peace Book Subtitle: A Social Analysis of Peacebuilding Book Author(s): CATHERINE GOETZE Published by: University of Michigan Press. (2017) Stable URL: JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- NoDerivatives 4.0 International. To view a copy of this license, visit . Funding is provided by Knowledge Unlatched. University of Michigan Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Distinction of Peace This content downloaded from 208.185.22.46 on Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:17:30 UTC All use subject to
170 Chapter 6 Narratives of Intervention Leadership, Liberalism, and Social Justice ••• The discourses of the ideal international civil servant and peace entre- preneur can be interpreted as self-legitimating strategies by peacebuild- ers to defend their particular interests as a social class, a profession in the making, and as representatives of international organizations, which need to find and confirm their place in world politics. As the notion of habitus implies, these strategies are not necessarily deployed rationally or even consciously; they are subconscious, incorporated normalities of behavior and thought. 1 Even though we can sensibly argue that the spe- cific self-interest of peacebuilders to construct their social position is a good reason for such kinds of discourses, we cannot assume that these discourses have an inherent merit, for example, that they are inherently rational or utility-maximizing. There could have been others. Those discourses that have been chosen, however, have been particu- larly attractive because they resonate and are effective with an audience that is important for peacebuilding’s existence: states, and in particu- lar Western states; NGOs and other international organizations, and in particular humanitarian and human rights NGOs; other liberal elites in overlapping fields; and the Western media, which function as amplifi- ers of peacebuilding’s causes and reasoning. The discourses are part of the symbolic exchange between these various actors of world politics, and accompany the exchange of other types of capital, be it people or This content downloaded from 208.185.22.46 on Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:17:30 UTC All use subject to
Narratives of Intervention 171

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