Craven 2 - In todays society, many people are not given the...

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In today’s society, many people are not given the time of day to make an impact on other people’s lives. In Margaret Craven’s I Heard the Owl Call My Name all three generations involved had a major impact on the story. Children in Craven’s story are very significant. Ethel and another child wander into the Mark Brian’s vicarage, the house of the young vicar who had just joined the tribe. They eventually became his first friends in the tribe. The children are also the life of the tribe. As they leave their families and village for schooling outside of the village their heritage is washed away like sand on a beach. During the funeral of Gordon’s mother, T.P. the elder “spoke in ancient Elizabethan Kwakwala” (Craven, 85). The children “tugged at their parents, asked, ‘What does he say’” (Craven, 85). The children, even at a young age do not know the native tongue. Older children come back from schooling during the break and “are ashamed to dip their food in the oil of the oolachon which we call gleena” (Craven, 62). Children also are the greatest hope of the village. Without them, the memories of adults and elders would not live on once they have died.
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course COM 225 taught by Professor Morrison during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Craven 2 - In todays society, many people are not given the...

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