330 Study Guide Test 1.docx - Study Guide 330 Test 1 Please note this list is not exhaustive nor does it mean you will see every term on the quiz It\u2019s

330 Study Guide Test 1.docx - Study Guide 330 Test 1 Please...

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Study Guide: 330 Test 1 Please note: this list is not exhaustive, nor does it mean you will see every term on the quiz. It’s meant to be a guideline for what you should have knowledge of at this point in the literacy sequence. Chapter 3 BB Chapter 1 (pgs. 27-28 only) BB Chapter 3 1. Alphabetic Principle- understanding that written letters make sounds and sounds go together to make spoken words (letter-name knowledge) and recoding (words can be decoded to sound out and encoded to spell out) 2. 5 Pillars of Reading a. Phonemic awareness- hearing the individual sounds in words. When a child has phonemic awareness, he will be able to identify and manipulate different sounds in words. Can be done “in the dark;” print or letters NOT needed. (8 categories) b. Phonics (and Concepts about Print)- Phonics= relationship of spoken phonemes to the graphemes that represent those sounds, COW= “book knowledge” (direction to read, how to hold it, etc.) c. Fluency- read with proper phrasing and expression, naturally d. Vocabulary- understanding decoded (sounded out) words by knowing the definition of that word e. Comprehension- ability to understand the story or text, able to make connections, infer, predict, and analyze 3. Blend- two consonants that blend together so that each consonant is still pronounced (ex: “bl” “fr” “sk”) 4. Concepts of print (and COW)- ability of a reader to match spoken words to written words while reading. Students with a concept of word understand that each word is separate, and that words are separated by a space within each sentence 5. Decodable text- densely packed with words that contain taught phonics patterns; therefore, students constantly “bump” into words with taught phonics patterns around every turn 6. Digraph- two consonants or vowels that make only one speech sound, with vowels: “first one does the talking” (ex: “oa” “ee” “ai) 7.
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