Social Psychology Midterm #1 Jose Cisneros.pdf - Cisneros 1...

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Cisneros 1 Jose Cisneros Prof. Powers 03.07.2019 Social Psychology (Soc 150) Overcooked and Unseasoned When meeting someone for the first time, the first thing an individual notices are the characteristics that correlate with ethnicity. The racial attribute of one’s identity plays a prominent role in the individual’s everyday life. Since the beginning of history, there has been a set of norm where the physical features one determine how you are supposed to act, and determines the lifestyle you must live. With the option to interview and compare 2 individuals of two different worlds grants me the opportunity to construct the opinions and really analyze where these two come from. Comparing a Latin American young man; myself, and a mixed individual of European and Chinese descent; my roommate, allows me to see which the perspectives of the two young men and introduce each other how one another grew up. Gathering this empirical evidence, I was able to distinguish and interpret what both myself and Jaren; my interviewee, believe what is it is like to be white, and I explain what the challenges were being a brown individual. Stereotypically, there are numerous ideas that have gone around with idea that some ethnic backgrounds have it easier than most, and the ethnic backgrounds who suffer challenges have to work twice as hard or even harder to have the same result. Upon this specific topic, I hold a fixed mindset, for the lack of a better term, I believe in this stereotype for a good amount of my life, but participating in my own investigation, I have allowed myself to view the other side and view ways of how my roommate was raised and learned about his morals. I know 1
Cisneros 2 him and I are different, but just how different are we in the sense of growing to love and respect our race, our culture, and the way we grew up. In this paper, I want to share how both of us, my roommate and I learned to live with the racial identity we were born with, not by force, but by learning how to accept the blessings and morals we were given to live by, as well as changing perspective lenses while conducting my research. The idea that sparked my interest on racial identity formation was when I first interacted with someone who no where near my shade of melanin. In the interview with Jaren, I asked multiple questions, one revolving around his mixed cultures. He grew up with a Chinese mother and a Caucasian father, and I asked if he was ever confused on which culture to identify as even though “biologically”, he was split down the middle. My subject stated, “There is not one I prefer, which should never be the case, but I possibly identify more as a white individual. Both of my parents made sure that traditions and celebrations of both sides were brought into my life.

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