Utopia Assignment 5 - Zoe King Professor Sawaya HUM 1131 13 March 2019 Assignment 5 Western Ideals of a Utopian Society 1 The Shakers This

Utopia Assignment 5 - Zoe King Professor Sawaya HUM...

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Zoe King Professor Sawaya HUM 1131 13 March 2019 Assignment 5 Western Ideals of a Utopian Society 1) The Shakers This community was originally created in England by Mother Ann Lee in 1758 and was initially known as the Shaking Quakers due to their excessive movement during worshiping. The Shaker’s purpose was focused primarily on a simplistic and rural lifestyle, and their communities relied heavily on the idea of common ownership, celibacy and confessions of sins. This group also heavily supported equality between the sexes because they viewed that God created the world in a dual order, thus making the sexes equal in the eyes of God. Despite this the sexes were almost always separated, and each family did not consist of related individuals, rather those who had come into the community by choice to uphold the ideal of celibacy. They had several different communities across the eastern and midwestern United States as well as in England, yet only one of the communities has survived until present day which exists in rural Maine. The Shaker communities ended up collapsing due to major industrial developments after the Civil War and inability to compete with this economical demand, as Shakers were known for their furniture designs and other home goods. 2) Brook Farm/Transcendentalists This utopian community was also known as The Brook Farm Institute of Agriculture and Education and was initially established to focus and uphold the ideal of simplistic living. Founded by George Ripley in 1841, this utopian community upheld the ideals of freedom, harmony, merging of new ideas and values, and the connection between the mind and body. Believed manual labor was uplifting, thus requiring every member within the community to contribute a few hours of labor every day. An experiment with traditional Christian values, this community allowed its members ample opportunity for intellectual, spiritual and social growth and greatly valued recreational activities. Through this, the Brook Farm strived towards eliminating the division between the educated and laboring classes. The existence of this community however relied heavily on money, and
due to persistent financial troubles as well as arguments between members in the society regarding how it should be run, the Brook Farm collapsed in 1847. 3) The Rappites/The Harmony Society Founded by Johann George Rapp in the 1780’s in Germany, this utopian community migrated to the United States in 1803 due to being oppressed for their religious views while in Germany. This group upheld the ideal that the Bible should be the sole authority over humanity, and that those within the community gave up all their possessions and pledged absolute obedience to the ideals of the community. They believed in the second

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