22: Dystan Mecial Supply Company

22: Dystan Mecial Supply Company - Dystan Mecial Supply...

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Dystan Mecial Supply Company- Cold Packs and Hot Packs* A Self-Directed Experiment October 15, 2007 April McDaniel Olivia Barkett Megan Stoker
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Introduction: Purpose of the Experiment Dystan Medical Supply Company has asked scientists to determine which salts should be used in the development of cold and hot packs. They want the salts that will help make the packs the most efficient and best economically. We are given four different salts to test: potassium chloride, lithium chloride, calcium chloride, and ammonium nitrate. The company has also asked us to determine the cost per unit for the two different packs. The third part of the experiment consists of determining for the cold pack the mass of the salt at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius and for the hot pack a temperature of 64 degrees Celsius. The purpose of the experiment is to determine which salts are best for the production of hot and cold packs and the unit cost of the production of hot or cold packs. In summary, the ionic compounds best suited for producing hot and cold packs will be determined. The cost of producing a hot and a cold pack will be determined per unit as well. Background Information: Energy is either consumed or discharged from an ionic compound when it is diffused in water. This energy is taken or given to or from the ionic compound’s surroundings. Endothermic Processes happen when heat is consumed during a chemical reaction. Exothermic Processes occur when heat is dispersed from a chemical reaction. Whether or not a salt can be used in the production of a hot or cold pack is actuated by its enthalpy of dissolution. Hot and cold packs are utilized by athletes when they sustain an injury. Sprained ankles often call for cold packs due to the fact that the cold pack pulls heat away from the ankle, lowering the temperature of the wounded site. This is done to prevent reduce inflammation by generating vasoconstriction of the blood vessels and lower blood flow. Hot packs are used to
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relieve pain, reduce muscle spasms, muscle soreness, and inflammation. Temperature at the injured site is increased as the heat moves from the hot pack to the particular area. Raising the temperature allows the production of vasodilation that advances the blood flow into the targeted tissue. The healing routine is helped along by this advanced blood flow that brings much needed oxygen and nutrients to the injury. Hot and cold packs are made up of a plastic bag that contains two separate sections: one filled with a salt and one filled with water. When ready to be utilized, the bag is broken and the water and the salt mix and the salt dissolves in the water. The concentration of the salt allots how hot or cold the pack will get. Hot packs can reach temperatures as high as 90°C and cold packs can reach temperatures as low as 0°C and last for approximately 15-20 minutes. The ionic compound will begin with crystal lattice structure and when it dissolves in the
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course CHEML 1211 taught by Professor Stanton during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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22: Dystan Mecial Supply Company - Dystan Mecial Supply...

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