Discussion comments historical era moderity and enlightment.docx

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Modernity Era: Horace Mann was such an influential person in the reformation of schools. I wrote about Friedrich Froebel , the founder of kindergarten. Like Mann, Froebel advocated the the importance of God. Froebel felt that all originates in God. Mann enacted teacher preparation programs, which Froebel found important as well. In order to teach kindergarten, Froebel asked for teachers to observe child life, games, play, and activity (Gutek, 2011). Froebel wanted all kindergarten teachers to have a philosophical foundation. Mann felt that children of all ages should be brought together in order to embrace diversity and provide enlightenment. Froebel also embraced that in a way as he felt that in kindergarten children are to learn that they are members of a great, universal, spiritual community (Gutek, 2011). Overall, Froedel and Mann share multiple similarities. Froedel was a pioneer for kindergarten and Mann was a pioneer was public school. Today, their work is carried on throughout public schools and kindergarten. Gutek, G. L. (2011). Historical and philosophical foundations of education: A biographical introduction (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Mann may have been one of the biggest contributors to the education system we see today. He served to create a public school that encompassed all socioeconomic classes and much diversity. Both Mann and Robert Owen believed that education was what was needed to improve social and economic conditions. Both believed that peaceful reform was the way to go. Mann believed that schools should teach foundational Christian values, but not directly teach any specific denomination. Whereas, Owen didn't subscribe to the use of any religious aspects within his education ideology. Both wanted a better society, but Mann didn't share the same U topian ideals that Owen held. Mann was more concerned with using education to produce "responsible citizens" because an uneducated population could not effectively govern themselves. Man seemed to have presented a more well-rounded educational approach than Owen did. Both expanded curriculum to include more than just reading, writing, spelling and arithmetic. Owen believed in communitarianism , communal property, and conformation to Owenistic beliefs. Conversely, Mann strived for people to create "a shared community of mutual interest" ( Gutek , 2011). Mann also struggled with the idea of the separation of church and state. As mentioned previously, Mann's compromise was to have just the foundational Christian values present within the schools, and today this issue still surfaces as post-modernism and relativity call for an alternate sense of tolerance (Moreland, 2007). References Gutek, G. L. (2011). Historical and philosophical foundations of education: A biographical introduction(5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

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