Rehabilitation Vs Punitive Punishment.docx - Studentu2019s...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Student’s Last Name.1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Subject DD Month YYYY Rehabilitation Vs Punitive Punishment. A New Look At the American Juvenile Criminal Justice System. Historically there have been four primary goals of penalty in the American Criminal Justice system: “retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation” (Peak & Kenneth). America developed a more punitive system that only meets the first three of these four goals. Whether it be the “colonial, penitentiary, reformatory, progressive, medical, community, or crime control model,” America used punitive punishment such as death, or lengthy imprisonment as a way of meeting crime punishment goals (Peak & Kenneth). While a lot of research suggests that mental health rehabilitation would be more effective in reducing crime, America has continuously gone along with its punitive nature. Perhaps if more Americans listened to reports like the one written “in 2014, [by] the National Academies of Sciences which stated that long jail convictions are ineffective as an offense control measure,’’ this would not be the case (Travis & Jeremy). Maybe then, it would be easier to accept that, the current crime control model is not working, and new legislation needs to be put in place. America could use, The Comprehensive Youth Justice Amendment Act, a piece of legislation that uses rehabilitative measures to reduce recidivism rates in the Juvenile Criminal Justice system, on a nationwide level.
Student’s Last Name.2 In the paper, Getting Tough on Crime, Judith Greene writes about the American Criminal Justice System, how it has developed, and it’s politicization from the 1970s through the 1990’s. She says that the basis of truth in condemning was mainly built within the victims’ right of movement as a punitive crime control strategy (Travis & Jeremy). Victims wanted revenge or in more technical term retribution, and this feeling was not unprecedented. Going as far back as the “Code of Hammurabi”, there has been a tradition of meeting violence with more violence (Peak & Kenneth). In fact, this ideology of getting equal with one’s aggressor is so strongly rooted that it is what formed much of our criminal justice system and informed our perceptions of offenders. We can see that it still has some impact on today’s society, by reflecting on what we see and hear in popular media. On TV, we are repeatedly getting messages about, “celebrated cases” (especially gruesome and heinous) (Peak & Kenneth). These cases often end in the death or life imprisonment of the offender, and we justify this because of the nature of the crime committed. However, “the majority of the cases in this system are misdemeanor offenses” (Peak & Kenneth).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture