Head-Lice-Protocol.doc - SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS HEALTH SERVICES HEAD LICE PROTOCOL APRIL 2013 SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS Health Services TABLE OF

Head-Lice-Protocol.doc - SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS HEALTH...

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SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLSHEALTH SERVICESHEAD LICE PROTOCOLAPRIL 2013
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SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLSHealth ServicesTABLE OF CONTENTSHEAD LICE PROTOCOL:EXAMINATION & EVALUATION............................3SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS:General and Public Health Information about Lice for Schools to use periodicallyStart of School Year Letter to Parents about Lice............................................5Head Lice Screening Information for Parents/Guardians...............................6Notes from the Nurse...........................................................................................7RESOURCES....................................................................................................................8Page No. 2L.O. 7/25/2019
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SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLSHealth ServicesHEAD LICE (PEDICULOSIS) EXAMINATION AND EVALUATIONPURPOSETo contain infestation of head lice among the school age population while maximizing students’ academic performance and minimizing absences due to unnecessary exclusion of students using nursing/medical best practices. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of School Nurses s’ no longer endorse a “No Nits” policy in schools. Exclusion is not an effective tool in reducing lice outbreaks (CDC, 2010; Frankowski & Bocchini, 2010; Frankowski & Weiner, 2002). In cases that involve head lice, as in all school health issues, it is vital that the school nurse prevent stigmatizing and maintain the student’s privacy a well as the family’s right to confidentiality (Gordon, 2007).STANDARDThe school nurse will examine the head of any child suspected of having a live lice infestation and notify the parent/guardian. Head lice are not a health hazard or a sign of being unclean and are not responsible for the spread of disease (Frankowski & Weiner, 2002). Positive lice are not apublic health emergency. Lice cannot hop or fly; they crawl. Transmission in most cases occurs by direct contact with the head of another infested individual (Chunge, et al. 1991).Children returning to school after treatment for head lice will be examined by the school nurse to verify absence of live lice prior to entering the classroom. Presence of nits does not indicate active infestation and no evidence is found that the presence of nits correlates with any disease process (Scott, Gilmer, Johannessen, 2004). Other studies show that lice are not highly transferable in the school setting (Hootman, 2002) and no outbreaks of liceresulted when allowing children with nits to remain in class (Scott, Gilner & Johannessen, 2004). Nurses will perform targeted pediculosis screenings based on the affected student’s known close contacts and family members. Whole class screenings for nits alone have not been proven to be effective and will only be performed based on multiple live lice infestations found in a single class (CDC, 2010; Frankowski & Weiner, 2002).PROCEDUREUpon notification of suspected cases of head lice, the school nurse will examine the student.An infestation will be determined by looking closely through the hair and scalp for viable nits or live lice. Lice and nits (dirty-white to gray colored eggs attached to the hair shaft) are visible to the naked eye. Nits that are farther than 1/4 inch (hair growth takes time) are either empty or dead.
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