Headlice_parent.doc - Is There a Louse in the House A Head Lice Information Package For Parents\/Family TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION 1 NHA

Headlice_parent.doc - Is There a Louse in the House A Head...

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Is There a Louse in the House? A Head Lice Information Package For Parents/Family
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PAGE # INTRODUCTION 1 NHA POSITION STATEMENT 2 WHAT PARENTS CAN DO 3 BIOLOGY OF HEAD LICE 4 MYTHS AND FACTS 5 TREATMENT OPTIONS: 7 OPTION A – KILL THE LICE & REMOVE THE NITS 7a) OPTION B – REMOVE THE LICE AND FORGET THE 7b) OPTION B TREATMENT SCHEDULE 7c) WHERE TO GET CHEMICAL TREATMENTS 8 OTHER TREATMENTS 9 WHEN TREATMENT DOESN’T WORK 10 EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 12 REFERENCES 13 TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Head lice can affect anyone. Head lice are annoying and may cause itching, but they do not transmit or cause disease. Children and adult’s reactions to head lice can subject children to teasing, bullying and isolation. Reactions to head lice can significantly interfere with a child’s emotional well-being, social status in the classroom and ability to learn. For these reasons, head lice infestations should be treated. Current research shows that school exclusion, early dismissal and no-nit policies do not prevent or control head lice infestations. In fact, these practices further stigmatize children, erode their self-esteem and interfere with learning. These practices are also at odds with other health concerns. For example, children with colds or flu viruses have a greater potential for spreading illness but are seldom excluded from school because of these. It is important to keep children from missing school. Children should not be excluded from school or sent home early because of head lice. Parents of children should be advised to treat children to prevent the negative emotional and social impact of head lice infestations. 1 INTRODUCTION
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The Northern Health Authority does not support school exclusion, early dismissal and no-nit policies as these disrupt the education process and adversely affect children’s self-esteem and social status in the classroom. RATIONALE 1) Lice may be present on the scalp for weeks before they are discovered. Only 30 percent of individuals scratch their scalp when they have head lice. As children are often in the classroom for days or weeks before head lice are detected, there is no benefit in sending them home early. 2) Head lice infestations are often misdiagnosed. The presence of fluff or dandruff in the hair are often mistaken for nits. Also, the presence of nits does not mean a child has an active infestation. It is difficult to differentiate between nits and empty egg casings. Even under ideal conditions, 10-30% of nits do not hatch. 3) Head lice are frequently over diagnosed, which leads to overuse of pediculocides (chemical head lice products). Overuse of pediculocides can be hazardous to a child’s health. 4) Negative reactions to head lice adversely affect children by subjecting them to teasing and bullying.
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  • Summer '14
  • Head louse, Pediculosis, Louse, head lice, Treatment of human head lice, Lice Treatment and Prevention

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