Fed Gov Exam 3.docx - Political Socialization Process through which underlying political values are formed#1 Predictor Family Demographic Effects

Fed Gov Exam 3.docx - Political Socialization Process...

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Political Socialization Process through which underlying political values are formed #1 Predictor: Family Demographic Effects: - Education gender - SES (Socioeconomic status) - Religion - Race/ethnic croup - Peers/Groups New Reporting Media - Control news/public agenda - Fame issues Wars and other focusing events Geographical Place and Political Culture Internet and Social Media: Benefits - Instant information - Global Connectivity - Expansive Mobilization Sign petitions Organize protests - Specific Issue oriented Challenges: - Central Control - Din - Digital Divide - Bots and data analytics All affect how we vote and form political beliefs Forms of Political Participation: Traditional - Voting Petitions - Supporting campaigns - Contacting officials - Talking/posting about issues Online
- Issue-driven individuated activism Creative - Boycotts and Buycotts These are how the common folk can participate’ Influences on who votes: Individual Preferences and traits - Socialization Efficacy vs. apathy Identity politics Political Environment - Competitive Elections - Tribalism- party identification matters more than ideology State Electoral Laws - Registration, id laws, ballot integrity, getting polls. Etc. Values (Beliefs) - Long lasting and difficult to change - Product of socialization, influences ideology Attitudes (Opinions) - Can be guided by emotional actions - Specific responses Guide Gov With Public Opinion - People must know what they want - Communicate to political leaders through Elections Representative Surveys Interest Groups and political parties Measuring Public Opinion: Scientific Polling - Sampling Frame Representative of Population Sample Randomly Selected - Survey Methods Robo-calls Face to face interviews
Exit Polls - Skewing Results Framing Results Bias Push polls How Polls Effect Us - Bandwagon Effect - Boomerang Effect - Underdog Effect Does Public Policy Reflect Public Opinion? - Government policies sometimes do not reflect public opinion - Studies reveal that public policy coincides highly with public opinion - Substantial opinion is almost always followed by change in the same direction Political attitudes towards voting, who votes Elections in the United States - Times, places, and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations - Letting states have control over elections Federalism: Sharing that power with the states. expanding suffrage on who can vote only by federal though not decided by states Federal Expansion of Suffrage and Texas Limits - 1788 White men with property - 1830s White men (sometimes Hispanics) - 1865-1870: Reconstruction restrictions on voting Iron clad oath required to vote or run for office (Iron Oath states that the voter never supported the confederacy) - 3 Civil war Amendments 13 th 14 th 15 th (Free, citizens, vote) - After reconstruction, TX government abandons 3 Civil War Amendments - 13 th (Black Codes) 14 th (Jim Crow Segregation) 15 th

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