CH7- CONTRACEPTION.pdf - CHAPTER 7 FEATURES Ethical Dimensions Abstinence-Only Versus Comprehensive Sexuality Education Communication Dimensions Condom

CH7- CONTRACEPTION.pdf - CHAPTER 7 FEATURES Ethical...

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C H A P T E R C H A P T E R O B J E C T I V E S F E A T U R E S s e x u a l i t y . j b p u b . c o m / d i m e n s i o n s / 4 e sexuality.jbpub.com/dimensions/4e Ethical Dimensions: Abstinence-Only Versus Comprehensive Sexuality Education Emergency Contraception The Future of Contraceptives Ethical Dimensions Abstinence-Only Versus Comprehensive Sexuality Education Communication Dimensions Condom Use and Consistency: Talking About Condom Use Multicultural Dimensions Ethnic and Age Differences in Access to Emergency Contraception Gender Dimensions Gender Equality in Contraception Use Gender Dimensions Margaret H. Sanger: A Woman of Influence Global Dimensions Emergency Contraception: How Is NOR-Levo in France Different from Plan B in the United States? Global Dimensions Unmet Need for Contraception in Developing Countries Contraception 7 ? ? 1 Discuss the reasons to use contraceptives, ways to choose a contraceptive, and the difference between perfect use and typical use. 2 Evaluate the nonprescription methods of contraception, including the effectiveness, the reversibility, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Explain why some have higher rates of user effectiveness than others. 3 Evaluate the prescription methods of contraception, including the effectiveness, the reversibility, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Explain why some have higher rates of user effectiveness than others. 4 Discuss the viability of future contraceptive methods. Consider the impact of gender issues, pharmaceutical industry costs for litigation, federal regulation compliance, and FDA approval.
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I N T R O D U C T I O N T hroughout life, people’s use of and need for contraceptives change. The case history of Susan presents a typical contracep- tive user. During her first sexual encounter at age 18 years, Susan’s high school boyfriend used withdrawal. During her freshman year at college, she began a steady sexual relation- ship with Jack. Because she was in a monogamous relationship and did not have to worry about sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission, Susan began to use oral contraceptives (the pill). After she had diffi culty remember- ing to take her pill every day, Susan switched to injectable medroxyprogester- one acetate (Depo-Provera). Every 3 months she would receive her birth- control shot at a clinic. After she and Jack broke up, she was abstinent for a year—the most foolproof method of contraception available. Susan graduated from col- lege and was fitted with a diaphragm; she also used condoms with her two partners. By age 25 years she married Stephen and had levonorgestrel (Nor- plant) inserted into her upper arm. The Norplant releases a steady stream of contraceptive into the reproductive system and is effective for up to 5 years. When the company producing the implants withdrew them from the market, she had the Norplant removed. At her doctor’s suggestion, she switched to a non-hormone-based contraceptive (foam and condoms) for 3 months before trying to conceive a child.
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