Draft-National-STI-Policy-Document-10-July-2017 (1).pdf -...

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MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION NATIONAL SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION POLICY (2017 2020) MAY, 2017
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FOREWORD Ghana’s attainment of middle -income status with per capita GDP in excess of $1,000 currently is very laudable. It is a long way from the $400 per capita of the 1990s. More importantly, the achievement sets the tone for the ambitious goal of attaining a per capita GDP of $3,000 as announced by the Government of Ghana. However, such national ambitions can only be attained on the wheels of a solid base of Science, Technology and Innovation (STI). This is the resounding lesson from the advancement of the industrialized and newly industrialized countries such as Korea, China and India. Soon after independence in 1957, Ghana realized the importance of creating a national capacity for STI. A number of scientific institutions were built to address the challenge of a young state emerging from a colonial era and establishing its membership in the Commonwealth of Nations. The Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences (GAAS), Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) and the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) were key institutions set up to address the crucial challenge of forging a scientific and technological base for the country’s socio -economic development programmes. Today there is an even more crucial role for STI in national development. The technological advancement the world has experienced in recent years would have been unimaginable two or three decades ago. The revolutionary effect of new technologies particularly information and communication technology (ICT), biotechnology and nanotechnology, has transformed human activities and inter-state relations in several dimensions. In agriculture, industry, education, health, commerce, finance and other sectors of the economy, the new technologies have enhanced production, processing and marketing both quantitatively and qualitatively. With regards to the internet, the scope of socio-economic realities has
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expanded into virtual space. The challenge of building a national scientific and technological capacity has become more urgent and intensive. Whereas previously the tal k was mainly about “science and technology”, now it is about “science, technology and innovation” and their effective application in the national economy and the wider society. There is still the fundamental problem of catching up technologically with the more advanced countries, but nowadays the emphasis is more on the essential driver and sustainer of socio- economic transformation in the world innovation. Innovation ensures the use of knowledge to bring about scientific and technological applications which are new in the context of usage even though they may not be new in other parts of the world. In every sector of the national economy, there are specific problems to which innovation could provide good solutions. It is thus a pivot of economic growth and must be at the centre
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