Chapter 5 Study Guide - The Cultural Landscape by Rubenstein Chapter 5 Languages Key Issue 1 Where Are Languages Distributed Pages 142-149*Always keep

Chapter 5 Study Guide - The Cultural Landscape by...

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The Cultural Landscape by Rubenstein Chapter 5: Languages Key Issue 1: Where Are Languages Distributed? Pages 142-149 ***Always keep your key term packet out whenever you take notes from Rubenstein. As the terms come up in the text, think through the significance of the term. 1.Definelanguage: 2.Define official language 3.Define language family 4.Define language branch 5.Definelanguage group: 6. Make brief notes on each of the following language families as you read about them in this section (i.e. how many people speak a language of that family, where spoken, common languages, etc.). See pages 146-149. a. Indo-European most widely used language family predominant in Europe, South Asia, and North and Latin America b. Sino-Tibetan predominant in China (1.3 billion population - world’s highest) and smaller countries in Southeast Asia no single chinese language - most common is mandarin (official language of China and Taiwan and one of the six official languages of the United Nations) 7 other Sinitic branch languages are spoken by at least 20 million is China - Wu, Min, Yue (Cantonese), JInyu, Xiang, Hakka, and Gan. c. Austronesian spoken by 6% of world population, mostly in Indonesia - world’s 4th populous country
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The Cultural Landscape by Rubenstein Chapter 5: Languages Javanese - spoken by 85 million people d. Austro-Asiatic spoken by 2% of world population based in Southeast Asia Vietnamese - most spoken - is written like our roman alphabet Vietnamese alphabet was devised in the 17th century by Roman Catholic missionaries e. Tai Kadai was once classified in Sino-Tibetan spoken in Thailand and neighboring portions of China similarities with the Austronesian family have led some linguistic scholars to speculate that people speaking these languages may have migrated from the Philippines f. Japanese written in part with Chinese logograms, Japanese also uses two systems of phonetic symbols like western languages used either in place of the logograms or alongside them Chinese cultural traits have diffused into japanese including the writing of it g. Korean written in a system known as hankul (aka hangul or onmun)- each letter represents a sound more than half of the vocab derives from Chinese words
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