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Chapter 9 notes - Chapter 9 Chemical Bonding Lecture...

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Slide No. 1 Chapter 9: Chemical Bonding Overview We learn how atomic structure and electron configurations explain how atoms combine into molecules. Introduction Major types of chemical bonding Valence electrons and Lewis diagrams for atoms Ionic Compounds Lewis Structures Lattice Enthalpy Molecular compounds Ionic and Covalent Bonds Reading: 9.1 – 9.5 Homework Problems: 8(9), 10(11), 20(21a,c), 26(27), 39(40), 50,51, 52(53), 54(55), 57(58) Lecture Outline Slide No. 2 9.1 Atomic properties and chemical bonding What is chemical bonding? Bonding is the _________ or ________ of electrons between atoms resulting in new forces that hold the atoms together. Types of bonds ionic bonds (9.2) covalent bonds (9.3) metallic bonds (9.5) Metals+non metals Only non metals Only metals Generally formed between: Electron transfer Electron sharing Electron pooling
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Slide No. 3 Examples of Bonding Types Classify the bond interactions in these substances: Example Ionic Covalent Metallic copper, Cu carbon monoxide, CO calcium fluoride, CaF 2 brass (Cu-Zn alloy) potassium sulfate, K 2 SO 4 xenon, Xe hydrochloric acid, HCl lithium niobate, LiNbO 3 graphite, C 9.1 Atomic properties and chemical bonding Slide No. 4 Valence Electrons – A Review Sb [Kr] 5s 2 4d 10 5p 3 Br [Ar] 4s 2 3d 10 4p 5 Si [Ne] 3s 2 3p 2 Cs [Xe] 6s 1 Element No. of Valence electrons Electron configuration Definitions of valence electrons Simplified: "Everything beyond the largest noble gas core" More sophisticated: Electrons in the highest __________________. Filled d 10 and f 14 sublevels are __________ from the valence level. Filled d and f sublevels are so stabilized by being completely filled that they become chemically inert – like part of the "core." How do we figure valence electrons for transition metals? The bonding theory for transition metals is somewhat more complex. We learn about that in CHEM 1036. 9.1 Atomic properties and chemical bondingc
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