AUA8_M07.docx - Running head MODULE 7 ASSIGNMENT 1 Module 7...

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Running head: MODULE 7 ASSIGNMENT1Module 7 AssignmentAspen UniversityHealth Care USAAUA8
MODULE 7 ASSIGNMENT2AbstractThe quality of care has changed over the decades, and so has the definition of the quality of care.Physicians use to be the deciding factor on what technical performance was classified as quality of care. The quality of care has been known as, “achieving the greatest benefit at the lowest risk.” There are resources that address this goal and they will be discussed below. Also, implicit and explicit criteria for healthcare are important, and this paper will address the criterion useful in the quality of care.
MODULE 7 ASSIGNMENT3Quality of Medical CareThe days of “doctor knows best” are vanishing. Patients are wanting more autonomy and to have a say in what is done to them and for them. 150 years ago, Florence Nightingale advocated that quality of healthcare was based around behavior and attitudes and were fundamental to the care patients received (Beattie, Howieson, & Shepherd, 2013). The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has defined quality of care as the degree in which health services for either the population or an individual increases the likelihood of desired health outcomes and remain consistent with current medical knowledge (Clearly & O’Kane, n.d.). The IOM expanded on this definition to provide 6 aims that would improve the quality of care for each patient (Clearly & O’Kane, n.d.). These aims are as follows, equitable, timely, effective, efficient, safe and patient centered (Clearly & O’Kane, n.d.). These aims describe two related, but very distinct types of evidence; technical and interpersonal (Clearly & O’Kane, n.d.). Interpersonal is essentially patient centered care, and one of the main distinctions is that it allows the patient to be involved in their care (Clearly & O’Kane, n.d.). In 1990 the IOM released a report that stated there was a widespread underuse of inexpensive caring services, expensive invasive technology and the use of error-prone procedures that would end up harming patients and wasting money (Kroth & Young, 2018).

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