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Meeting 11 - Meeting 11 Iliad Book 20 Achilles as berserker...

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Meeting 11 Iliad , Book 20, Achilles as berserker. Book 21. Achilles still on the rampage. Book 22 Hector meets Achilles and is slain. Mourning over Hector. There are many issues here connected with human behavior in war and the forces that control the fates of human beings. What triggers Achilles’ transformation into an out-and-out killing machine? What drives him on? Is he satiable? See also cases, going all the way back to the original duel between Menelaus and Paris, where the gods create fog that disorients and blinds warriors in combat. Von Clausewitz "war as a disorienting fog", no such thing as an "algebra of war." In the conduct of war, perception cannot be governed by laws. [War produces]” a kind of twilight, which like fog or moonlight, often tends to make things seem grotesque." Tim O’Brien "How to Tell a True War Story." Death of Ted Lavender. Tendency to look away and then to look back at violence done. Seemingness itself becomes the truth about the event as perceived originally. See his transformation in Book 19: 19.18-30 She spoke. and when she set the armor down before Achilles, All of the metalwork clattered and chimed. The Myrmidons shuddered, and to a man Could not bear to look at it. But Achilles, When he saw it, felt his rage seep Deeper into his bones, and his lids narrowed And lowered over eyes that glared Like a white-hot steel flame. He turned The polished weapons the god had given him Over and over in his hands, and felt Pangs of joy at all its intricate beauty. Cf. the scene in Kubrick's *Full Metal Jacket* based on the novel The Short Timers . 19.68-167: Achilles and Agamemnon ‘reconcile’. Note Achilles short , direct speeches, and Agamemnon’s long speech wherein he blames até (divinely sent folly) for his alienation of Achilles. The Greeks arm themselves around Achilles, who is called the vortex of war 20.1-33 Zeus orders Themis (who is the personfication of divinely ordained and ‘set-down’ law) to call all divinities (even women and naiads and dryads) to Olympus; Zeus tells Poseidon that he will sit out and watch and that the other deities can join in battle, because if Achilles is let loose without divine intervention, “[h]e may exceed his fate and demolish the wall [of Troy].”
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See 20.44-49 Achilles’ reappearance had turned Trojans and their allies to spineless jelly, quivering at the sight of A. fighting and gleaming like the war god. On the Greek side are the deities: Hera, Pallas Athena, Poseidon, Hermes, Hephaestus . On the Trojan side are: Ares, Apollo, Artemis, Leto, Xanthus, Aphrodite . They cause Strife (Eris) to explode in each camp. Hades (the god of the Underworld) is fearful that the vault of earth will split open and reveal him. 20.71 ff. The gods pair off in opposition to one another. Poseidon vs. Apollo Athena vs. Ares Hera vs. Artemis, Hermes vs. leto Hephaestus vs. Xanthus (mortal: Scamandrius) Achilles wants Hector and Hector’s blood to glut Ares’ thick belly, but Apollo, in the guise of Lycaon, tries to shame Aeneas into stepping forward. Aeneas (20.88-107) recounts how he faced Achilles before when Achilles wasted Lyrnessus and Pedasus. Achilles was protected then by Athena.
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