Lecture10_ScarceMed1.pdf - Ethics in Science and \u0000\b\u001d Engineering Bioengineering 100 Fall 2014 UC Berkeley Reading Assignment Chap 7(resource allocation

Lecture10_ScarceMed1.pdf - Ethics in Science and...

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Lecture 10 Ethics in Science and EngineeringBioengineering 100Fall 2014UC Berkeley Reading Assignment:Chap. 7 (resource allocation only): Budinger & BudingerOct. 7: Debate #2 and HW#2 Oct. 9: Ted Talks on Modern Ethical Dilemmas and Discussion (SULAIMAN ) (CARYN) (RYLEE)Oct. 14: Midterm Exam #1: Lectures, HW, debates from Aug. 28-Oct. 9
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Lecture 10 Ethics of Scarce Medical Resources [1] Scarcity of medical resources, such as equipment, beds, drugs, time, money, or scarcity due to excessive numbers of persons in need, require ethical guidance to make decisions in a fair and compassionate manner. Rationing of scarce medical resources, triage decisions in emergency rooms or natural disaster, or access to health care requires a clear set of rules for the fair distribution of a medical resource that is in short supply. We segue from human experimentation to scarce medical resources as we evaluate the historically emergent technologies of transplant surgery, xenografts, artificial organs in terms of experimental vs. therapeutic research.
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Lecture 10 Boundaries between Practice and Research It is important to distinguish between biomedical experimental research vs. the practice of accepted therapy, in order to know what activities ought to undergo review for the protection of human subjects of research [2]. Therapeutic practice refers to interventions that are designed solely to enhance well-being, by providing diagnosis, preventive treatment, or therapy to particular individual patients, and that have a reasonable expectation of success. Experimental research is a formal protocol that sets forth an objective and a set of procedures designed to reach that objective in order to test a hypothesis and permit conclusions to be drawn, and thereby to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.
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Lecture 10 Case Study [3]: The First Heart Transplant 55-year old Louis Washkansky was a bigger than life kind of guy who loved cards, sports, drinking, eating and smoking- an extrovert with a strong desire to live. However, years of “big” living contributed to a steady decline in his health: he was diabetic and had suffered three heart attacks, the last of which led to congestive heart failure. [4] His flabby heart was so swollen that it extended across the entire inside of his large chest [5].
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Lecture 10 Case Study [3]: The First Heart Transplant Barnard returned home to South Africa, and Washkansky began receiving the attention of the cardiologist at the Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, who wanted Louis to become the first recipient of a human heart.
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