Lecture18_Neuro1.pdf - Ethics in Science and \u0000\b\u001d Engineering Bioengineering 100 Fall 2014 UC Berkeley Reading Assignment Chap 12(pg 448-454 Ethics of

Lecture18_Neuro1.pdf - Ethics in Science and u0000bu001d...

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Lecture 18 Ethics in Science and EngineeringBioengineering 100Fall 2014UC Berkeley Reading Assignment:Chap. 12 (pg. 448-454) Ethics of Emerging TechnologiesB&BHomework #5 assigned 11/20 and due 12/2Debate #5 on 12/2Exam #2 on 12/4Final take home exam due Dec. 15
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Lecture 18 Duality of Neuroethics The ethics of neuroscience research: risk/benefit analysis of new technologies, who gets access to those technologies, how does the brain work and what new technologies can emerge in the future, etc etc. The specifics of the ethical questions pertain to neuroscience, but the ethical frameworks and questions are what we have encountered before. -francis-collins-on-brain-initiative/The neuroscience of morality and ethics: is brain function connected to moral actions, do we have control of our actions – i.e. do we have free will, can we alter moral actions by brain interventions, is the “abnormal” brain a mitigating factor for degree of punishment for immoral behavior?
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Lecture 18 Debate 5a: Electroceuticals The burgeoning field of “electroceuticals ” takes advantage of externalelectrical stimuli to transform the brain’s electrical activity. Someresearch scientists are using electroceuticals to ease patient’s severedepression or Parkinson’s symptoms with good results. Some people,however, don’t want to go to the trouble of enrolling in a lab study and are developing their own transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices to send small amounts of stable electric current into the scalp to simply improve mental function, for example to “excite your prefrontalcortex and get the edge in online gaming.” The Blue Team states that individuals have the right to explore a promising technology to either enhance their mental function or seek a cure for a medical condition for which there is no known cure, and that enough research is in place to know how to safely and effectively transmit electricity to the brain. TheGold Team strongly urges greater regulation and caution on use of tDCStechnologies since the efficacy is unknown, it may inappropriately maybe used on children or other burdened groups, and long term effects of electrical stimulation of the brain is poorly understood.
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Lecture 18 Debate 5b: NeuroLaw In the early 1990s Herbert Weinstein, a 65-year-old ad executive, was
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