Lecture Notes Chapter 11-10th edition Doc Rod Mods.docx

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ASB 353-Death and Dying Cross Cultural Perspectives, 10 th Ed. Chapter 11-Death in the Lives of Adults Outline and Lecture Notes Chapter Outline-Death in the Lives of Adults Death of the College Student Death of a Friend Death of a Parent Parental Bereavement o Childbearing Losses Miscarriage Induced Abortion Stillbirth Neonatal Death Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Grief for “Unlived” Lives The Death of an Older Child The Death of an Adult Child Coping with Bereavement as a Couple Social Support in Parental Bereavement Spousal Bereavement Factors Influencing Spousal Bereavement Social Support for Bereaved Spouses Aging and the Aged ______________________________________ This chapter will probably touch most of us in this class since it has to do with deaths in the lives of adults. It will be helpful to refer to the “Eight Stages of Man (People)” by Erik Erikson (remember those from psychology?) Those eight stages, with his descriptors of psychosocial development, are: 1. Trust---------Infants 2. Autonomy--Toddlers 3. Initiative----primary grade years 4. Industry-----middle school years 5. Identity-----high school, adolescence 6. Intimacy----young adults (20--40 years) 7. Generativity-middle-aged adults (40+--60 years) 8. Maturity-----older adults or late adulthood (60+ years) In this chapter, the author focuses on young adults, middle-aged adults and older adults. You will learn how death impacts the different developmental tasks for adults. Death of the College Student 1
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I hope you find it interesting to read about the essays written by Harvard students during their “Death Education” course. What does Shneidman mean when he states many of the essays emphasize a “metacrises”? Were you surprised to read that student GPAs drop when experience a death during their semester? What are the first and second leading causes of death in college students? If you were the Director of Student Affairs at a university, what options would you provide for students to reduce these two causes? What are some of the typical developmental issues that college students face? Death of a Friend Have you experienced the death of a good friend? Society does not provide much support when we lose friends. Few companies or employers have “bereavement” leave for individuals that have lost a friend. Most of us extend our sympathy but do not think to express the same kind of support to others as we do if one has lost a close family member. It is something for us to keep in mind. Death of a Parent Some of you have shared in your “Earliest Memories of Death” the loss of a parent and some of you have had a parent die though it may not be your earliest memory. For many of us, this is such a tragedy and may be one of the greatest losses that we have. As the authors stated in the Last Dance,
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  • Fall '16
  • Grief, Sudden infant death syndrome, support group

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