Poetry Forms.docx - PANTOUM is a type of poem with a verse...

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PANTOUM +is a type of poem with a verse form consisting of three stanzas. It has a set pattern within the poem of repetitive lines.The pattern in each stanza is where the second and fourth line of each verse is repeated as the first and third of the next. The pattern changes though for the last stanza to the first and third line are the second and fourth of the stanza above (penultimate). The last line is a repeat of the first starting line of the poem and the third line of the first is the second of the last. +A Malaysian verse form adapted by French poets and occasionally imitated in English. Another Lullaby for Insomniacs by A. E. Stallings Sleep, she will not linger: She turns her moon-cold shoulder. With no ring on her finger, You cannot hope to hold her. She turns her moon-cold shoulder And tosses off the cover. You cannot hope to hold her: She has another lover. She tosses off the cover And lays the darkness bare. She has another lover. Her heart is otherwhere. She lays the darkness bare. You slowly realize Her heart is otherwhere. There's distance in her eyes. You slowly realize That she will never linger, With distance in her eyes And no ring on her finger. SESTINA +a poem with six stanzas of six lines and a final triplet, all stanzas having the same six words at the line- ends in six different sequences that follow a fixed pattern, and with all six words appearing in the closing three-line envoi. +A complex French verse form, usually unrhymed, consisting of six stanzas of six lines each and a three- line envoy. The end words of the first stanza are repeated in a different order as end words in each of the subsequent five stanzas; the closing envoy contains all six words, two per line, placed in the middle and at the end of the three lines. The patterns of word repetition are as follows, with each number representing the final word of a line, and each row of numbers representing a stanza:
1 2 3 4 5 6 6 1 5 2 4 3 3 6 4 1 2 5 5 3 2 6 1 4 4 5 1 3 6 2 2 4 6 5 3 1 (6 2) (1 4) (5 3) Sestina of the Tramp-Royal By Rudyard Kipling 1896 Speakin’ in general, I ’ave tried ’em all— The ’appy roads that take you o’er the world.

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