EDCE 660 School Counseling Collaborative Model.docx - EDCE...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 12 pages.

EDCE 660 School Counseling Collaborative Model. DaShanda Umble Component #1: Professional Identity 1) Grounded in knowledge of history and trends in the profession, student describes roles and functions of the contemporary professional school counselor in relation to others within and outside of the school in planning and implementing a collaborative model for school counseling. School counselors serve two dual roles: as a counselor and educator. School counselors integrate the dual roles of educator and counselor into a succinct guiding philosophy that drives affective and cognitive domains of programming and professional practices (Schellenberg, 2013). School counselors address the individual holistic needs of students using individual counseling as a core responsive service delivery component of a comprehensive school counseling program (ASCA, 2012). Also, the professional school counselor engages with stakeholders to implement a mutual vision to support student development and achievement. Furthermore, school counselors think and act in a systematic fashion that mobilize all stakeholders and create school communities that enthusiastically pursue academic achievement and school success for all students (Dollarhide, 2017). Stakeholders include students, teachers, administrators, and staff inside the school and outside the school include parents, community members, and community agencies. Additionally, school counselors have relevant leadership, consultation, and management skills that enable them to carry out management duties in addition to meeting students’ personal, social, academic, and career development needs when planning and implementing a collaborative school model (Dollarhide, 2017). Lastly, counselors serve as advocates for students, which is also an important factor of a collaborative model. 2) Student demonstrates an understanding of professional credentials, associations, organizations, preparation standards, and the ASCA National Model in advocating for an appropriate professional identity and collaborative program. School counselors must complete a master’s degree program in school counseling and must fulfill their state licensing laws and requirements and take certification exams to become a school counselor. National accrediting boards establish training standards to make sure that all school counselors across the nation are prepared and qualified to work with clients (Dollarhide, 2017). Additionally, counselors must adhere to the rules set forth by ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors. Additionally, counselors must be multiculturally sensitive to diverse clients and competent in working with them. Also, counselors must advocate for students and their counseling programs (Dollarhide, 2017). Furthermore, counselors can document professional competence by becoming national certified. They can choose to become a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC) through the National Board of Certified

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture