Charlottesville.docx - 1 Bello Louissaint July 20th 2018...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

1 Bello Louissaint July 20 th , 2018 ENC1101 Dr. Kellen A City Divided: Charlottesville, Virginia Over the course of American history, there has been many turning points for race relations. In 1865, Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation that freed the slaves from slave owners. In the 1950s and 60s, the Civil Rights Movement thriving with leaders of the black community forming protest both nonviolent and violent to get equal rights for African- American citizens. They pushed forward for progress in the legal system, but this lacked fulfillment of their vision. In this graphic photo, we see multiple bystanders being upended in the air violently by a Dodge Challenger. The car presence being strong, and imposing illustrates what tackling strong issues like equal rights for African Americans has been like in America for people of color. As Nadeem Muaddi and Nora Neus, two journalists for CNN, writes “Fields, who is accused of killing one person and wounding 19 others, has already been charged with second-degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and failure to stop in an accident that resulted in death.” shows the totality of destruction this collision has caused. (Muaddi and Nora 1). I think that Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress, Charlottesville, Va. photo illustrates the current state of social justice in America. First, we will take a look at the event and recapped what happened. The local government of Charlottesville decided to remove confederate flags and monument throughout its city in response to the shooting that occurred in Charleston. The “Unite the Right” movement decided to protest this decision in large numbers meeting at the statue of Robert Lee on the University of
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

2 Bello Louissaint July 20 th , 2018 ENC1101 Dr. Kellen Virginia campus. As Jamelle Bouie, University of Virginia political science graduate, describes the first day of protest, “There were the clashes that marked the morning of August 12, where the racist provo- cateurs of “Unite the Right” confronted an array of counterprotesters, from local clergy to the much-discussed “Antifa” (short for antifascist) that met force with force. They gathered in the city’s Emancipation Park (neé Lee Park) where a monument to Robert E. Lee still stood, and where costumed far-right protesters—clad with makeshift shields and waving white supremacist standards—faced their opponents.” (Bouie 2). On the opposing side of the protest
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern