FINAL-POWERPLANT.docx - Rizal Technological University...

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Rizal Technological University College of Engineering and Industrial Technology Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering “PROPOSED COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT” In Partial Fulfillment of the Course Requirements in Power Plant Engineering Presented By: AMAY, ANGELO V. DELOS REYES, RYAN September 2014
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I. INTRODUCTION If power could be generated for the same cost at any point in the country there would be no difficulties arising from power distribution. The condition that early prevailed would still exist each power user would operate their own plant. But unless use may be made of the exhaust steam, the small privately owned plant is hardly able to complete with the central station on an economic basis because of the inherently higher efficiency of large generating units and the lower overhead cost of quantity production. Hence, although large numbers of small plants are in operation at present, the major portion of installed power capacity is too being found in central station. Power generated by industries may or may not be converted into electrical form before use, but that generated by central stations invariably electrical to permit transmission to distant points. Our country is rich in natural resources which we can use to create or transform into electrical energy. In this paper presents a coal power plant, its design consists of its location, possible loads, output power, resources needs, etc. The location is significant in designing the power plant to become effective and efficient. For site selections of coal-based thermal power station are as follows. 1. Nearness to coal source; 2. Accessibility by road and rail; 3. Availability of land, water and coal for the final installation capacity; 4. Coal transportation logistics; 5. Power evacuation facilities;
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6. Availability of construction material, power and water; 7. Preliminary environmental feasibility including rehabilitation and resettlement requirements, if any; 8. Locations of thermal power stations are avoided within 25 km of the outer periphery of the following: (a) metropolitan cities; (b) National park and wildlife sanctuaries; (c) Ecologically sensitive areas like tropical forest, biosphere reserve, important lake and coastal areas rich in coral formation; 9. The sites should be chosen in such a way that chimneys of the power plants do not fall within the approach funnel of the runway of the nearest airport; 10. Those sites should be chosen which are at least 500 m away from the flood plain of river system; 11. Location of the sites are avoided in the vicinity (say 10 km) of places of archaeological, historical, cultural/religious/tourist importance and defense installations; 12. Forest or prime agriculture lands are avoided for setting up of thermal power houses or ash disposal.
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  • Spring '18
  • Coal, Electricity generation, Power station technology

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