Jean Paul Sartre: Existentialism is a Humanism - ESSAY ASSIGNMENT LHUM 1310 Date Jean Paul Sartre Existentialism is a Humanism Jean-Paul Sartre one of

Jean Paul Sartre: Existentialism is a Humanism - ESSAY...

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ESSAY ASSIGNMENT LHUM 1310 Date: April 15, 2019
Jean Paul Sartre: Existentialism is a Humanism Jean-Paul Sartre, one of the renowned philosophers of the 20 th century was born in Paris in 1905. He traveled around the world with his wife, and he was also offered Noble prize for literature which he declined to accept. He was a French novelist, a writer, exponent of Existentialism, and he also developed an ontological argument of what it is to be a human (Flynn, p.15). His ontological arguments are very well explained in his masterpiece, “ Existentialism and Humanism” and “Being and Nothingness”. It was on October 1945 in Paris when Existentialism and Humanism were first presented as a public lecture. He provides the description of existentialism i.e. A key thought of existentialism—and of the human condition—is that existence precedes essence. What he meant by this was Humans have to born before they can be anything, they can’t be anything before they are born. It is important to understand what Sartre meant by Humanism. Humanism is a general term normally used to refer to any assumption which puts people at the focal point of things: so for example, the humanism of the Renaissance was described by a development far from the metaphysical theory about the idea of God to worry with crafted by mankind, particularly in craftsmanship and writing. Humanism has the positive undertone of being others conscious and is for the most part connected with a hopeful standpoint (Flynn, p.47-48). The lecture given by Sartre was not only to render more accessible many of the basic claims of larger work but also to answer the objection of Sartre’s leading critics. His critics said that this new philosophy was nothing but an incarnation of bourgeois individualism and criticized that this type of philosophy would not encourage but
discourage people from committing themselves to any action (Kaufmann, p.345).

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