TH EDITORIAL 31.05.2019.pdf -...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 2 pages.

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE DELHI THE HINDU FRIDAY,MAY31,2019 10 EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE C M Y K A ND-NDE EDITORIAL Krishnan Srinivasan O ver the past few months it has been a season of elec- tions.  The  word  populism has been much used, though nev- er clearly defined, and it becomes necessary to fall back on the dic- tionary meaning — ‘various, often anti-establishment or anti-intellec- tual political movements that offer unorthodox political policies and appeal  to  the  common  person’. The  election  result  in  India  has been greeted with predictable hos- tility in the British and U.S. media, with  commentators,  often  of  In- dian  origin,  scorning  the  electo- rate’s decision and accusing Prime Minister Narendra Modi of popu- lism, majoritarianism and failure to deliver on promises. These ana- lysts  clearly  want  India  trans- formed into a mirror image of the subsiding  Western  liberal  demo- cratic model.  The European transformation It is in Europe that the populist na- tionalist  trend  is  most  pro- nounced. In Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky,  whose  political  expe- rience is confined to portraying a president on TV, beat the incum- bent by winning over 70% of the vote to become the head of state. His new political party, Servant of the People, will now contest elec- tions to Parliament. President Em- manuel Macron of France brought a new party called Republic on the March into office with him. Nigel Farage,  an  ardent  champion  for Britain leaving the European Un- ion, launched a new party called Brexit Party to contest European Parliament  elections,  and  in France  Marine  le  Pen  rebranded her  party  ‘National  Rally’.  The changes  of  name  are  to  distance the new entities from the well-es- tablished  parties  of  the  centre- right and centre-left.  In Spain this April, despite bit- ter memories of dictator Francisco Franco,  the  far-right  Vox  party won nearly 10% of the vote. In the Philippines, President Rodrigo Du- terte, condemned in the West for authoritarianism and abuse of hu-

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture