Argentina's War for Independence: Presentation - Argentina...

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Argentina Ian Estevez, Leslie Perez, Emily Hernandez Period 4
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Vocabulary Viceroyalty: a territory ruled by a viceroy. Viceroy: a ruler exercising authority in a colony on behalf of a sovereign. Spaniard: a native or inhabitant of Spain, or a person of Spanish descent. Junta: a revolutionary government or meeting. Cabildo: a town or local government council.
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Before Independence Argentina originated in the 16th Century. Argentina was part of the Viceroyalty of South America (Virreinato del Rio de la Plata). Buenos Aires was, and still is the capital of Argentina. The Paraná River remains to be a prominent route for linking cities in Buenos Aires ("Father of the Waters" Sebastian Cabot in 1526). Charles IV was the king at the time, having been allied with Napoleon before France’s betrayal.
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Social Structure Peninsulares-Spaniards or the Portuguese Creoles- Spaniards born in Latin America Mestizos-Europeans and Indians Mulattoes- Europeans and Africans Africans/Natives- Africa
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There were two types of groups: the revolutionaries and realists. They had many rich resources that lead to many violent arguments. Cisneros renounced his post as viceroy, as an angry crowd gathered at the open cabildo. Tension started to increase; war was on the horizon. Social Rivalries & Tensions
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Developments Towards Independence The roots of the Argentine War of Independence actually lie in the Napoleonic Wars of 1803 - 1815. During the Napoleonic Wars came about the battle for the Iberian Peninsula between France & Spain against Great Britain & Portugal. This was called the Peninsular War, which lasted from 1807 - 1814. Napoleon began this war in 1807 when he ordered Portugal to close its ports to Britain, and declare war on them as well. When Portugal hesitated to act, Napoleon swiftly sent an army of 30,000 troops marching straight through Spain (its ally at the time) to Portugal to capture it. Although the troops succeeded, they lingered in their control over the northern parts of Spain they had crossed through. From here, France began to turn on Spain.
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France’s Betrayal Spain couldn’t manage to organize their government to fight back, so fearing a hostile takeover, Prime Minister Manuel de Godoy and King Charles IV attempted to flee to South America.
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  • Fall '19
  • Buenos Aires, Primera Junta

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