HIS306N2010939015.pdf - LAS 301#40080 History 306N#39015 Dr Virginia Garrard Burnett Key Ideas and Issues in Latin America TAs Samantha Serrano Samuel

HIS306N2010939015.pdf - LAS 301#40080 History 306N#39015 Dr...

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Unformatted text preview: LAS 301 #40080 History 306N #39015 Dr. Virginia Garrard Burnett Key Ideas and Issues in Latin America TAs: Samantha Serrano Samuel Frazier Fall 2010, T-­‐Th 9:30-­‐11 Syllabus Course Description: What is Latin America? The large area we refer to as “Latin America” is not unified by a single language, history, religion, or type of government. Nor is it unified by a shared geography or by the prevalence of a common ethnic group. Yet Latin America does, obviously, exist. It is a region forged from the merging of diverse cultures and historical experiences. In this course, we will explore the ways that various competing groups have “created” Latin America by introducing the ideas, issues, and values that define the region. Learning Objectives: Part I: The first third of this course will explore the cultural context of the “discovery” and conquest of Spanish and Portuguese America. We will examine in detail the ways in which European, African, and native America ways of life blended and clashed to form Latin American society. Part II: The second portion of the course will deal with some of the themes of Latin America’s quest for identity and nationhood during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will focus on such issues as civil war, social banditry, ethnic relations, and Latin America’s relationship with the industrial powers. Part III: The final third of the course will examine some specific trends and prevalent ideas in Latin America during the twentieth century, including revolution, military rule, population growth, and the relationship between development and the environment. We will also examine the “erasure” of national boundaries, as Latin and North America converge through immigration and globalization. Course Requirements: This course consists of reading, lectures, discussion, and multimedia presentations. Please have the assigned reading done before you come to class. Our class meetings will consist of discussions on the lectures, the readings, and the visual material. Please be aware that discussion and multimedia presentations are not optional or “filler”; they make up an integral part of the course. Because of this, it is imperative that you attend each class. Final grades will be calculated as follows: Midterm: 40% Final exam: 40% Movie critiques: 10% Attendance, study sessions,/journal: 10% Final grades for this course will employ the new plus/minus system. For more on this new policy, go to: -­‐minus Discussion sessions: A discussion group for this course will meet for one hour each week at a time and location to be determined by the TA. Participation in the discussion group is not mandatory, but it is highly recommended. Students who attend at least 3 study sessions are exempt from doing the journal project. Language Component: This course is offered as an optional language component course. This means that the some of the assigned texts and supplemental readings are available in either Spanish or English or, in at least one case, Portuguese. In addition, the discussion group for this class will be conducted in English and Spanish on alternate weeks. The ability to read or speak Spanish is not required for this course, so participation in the language component is entirely optional. Tests will be given and must be answered in English. However, movie critiques and extra credit projects can be submitted in Spanish or Portuguese if you prefer. Class Policies: Please be on time and attend every class. If there us an urgent reason that you must be absent, please let one of the TA know by email and be sure to get the notes you missed from another student. I do not post my notes on Blackboard. This class is a technology blackout zone! Please turn off all electronics, especially cell phones and I-­‐ Pods, before coming to class. PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR WI-­‐FI and use your computer only for taking notes during our class! No Facebook, no email, no Web browsing, no reruns of last night’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, nothing! Seriously. TAs will be monitoring and will ask you to shut down your computer if necessary. Academic Honesty: Anyone who turns in work that is not his or her own—the person who is claiming authorship—(l.e., downloaded off the Internet, plagiarized, borrowed from a friend, written by you but for a different class) will receive an F for this course, punto. Intellectual honesty is a minimum requirement for this course! Email: [email protected] (best method, but please be advised, I’m not available 24/7. I also try to stay away from my email over weekends) TA emails: [email protected], [email protected] TA office hours: TBA Reading Assignments Course packet available at I. T Copy. García Marquez, Gabriel. One Hundred Years of Solitude (1979) English, TJ. Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba and then Lost it to the Revolution (2008). ...
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