Week 1 Day 1 - VNSA220

Week 1 Day 1 - VNSA220 - VNSA220 Cyber Self Defense Erik...

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Unformatted text preview: VNSA220 Cyber Self Defense Erik Golen 4050-220-03 20081 1 Who am I? • 3rd year Ph.D. candidate in Computing and Information Sciences program • 8th year at RIT – Bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering – 1 year of teaching experience at RIT • 4 years of industry experience at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport as an Engineer • Research interest is underwater sensor networks 4050-220-03 20081 2 Intended audience This is NOT: A security class (but security basics will be discussed) Preparation to provide security for others WON’T make you a security professional 4050-220-03 20081 3 Intended audience This class should help you become – – – More AWARE More well-protected More capable of recognizing issues / risks 4050-220-03 20081 4 Why worry? 4050-220-03 20081 5 Perspective “At the end of the day, most crime prevention is about raising awareness – reading your credit report, shredding sensitive stuff, securing your mailbox, that kind of thing… …These days, it’s a good idea for people to be more than a little paranoid.” -Jimmy Doyle, former computer crimes investigator, NYPD 4050-220-03 20081 6 The course • Lab is a separate course (preparation for labs provided here) • (Relatively) New course – Material is flexible – Your experience will differ depending upon instructor’s interests and expertise – Syllabus might change – Pay close attention to myCourses for notices – BEST PART • You get to influence the future of this course 4050-220-03 20081 7 Grading • Midterm Exam 25% • Final Exam 25% • Term Paper 25% • Mini-report 5% • Homework 10% • Attendance/Participation 10% 4050-220-03 20081 8 Mini-reports • At the beginning of each class starting in Week 2 • Your turn to talk in class, break up the minutia • SHORT – a few (~5) minutes plus whatever discussion follows • Post link (URL) to myCourses discussion group named “Mini Reports” 4050-220-03 20081 9 Exams • Midterm • Final – Maybe cumulative • Format will consist of T/F, MC, fill in the blank, essay – Topics discussed in lecture, mini reports, and guest speakers 4050-220-03 20081 10 Term paper • 6-8 page not including appendices, title, etc. • Minimum of 5 pages (paper should be as long as • • it takes to get your point across) Due Monday 10/20 at midnight (Week 8) Subjects • Outline due Monday 10/6 midnight (Week 6) • Peer Review due Thursday 10/16 (Week 7) and counts as a homework assignment 4050-220-03 20081 – Something to do with security – Submit ideas to MyCourses discussion forum by the Monday 9/22 at midnight (Week 4) – Your review is reviewed by the reviewee (get it?) 11 Attendance and Participation • Required • Graded • Sign in sheet will be handed out at random, do not forget to sign it • Please do not make me call on people from the class list 4050-220-03 20081 12 Homework • As discussed in class through the quarter – – – Policy Assignment Review of Peer Review Group Brochure??? (possibly extra credit) 4050-220-03 20081 13 Introduce Yourself • Since this is a Learning Community section, introduce yourself to your classmates and myself: – – – Name Hometown What you expect/want to learn about in this course – Something interesting about yourself 4050-220-03 20081 14 How Bad is it (security issues)? • Between January 1 and June 30, 2007: • 6,784 new Windows viruses found • 196,860 unique phishing messages sent, an • • increase of 81% Home computers were most widely targeted, accounting for 95% of all targeted attacks 52,771 active bot infected computers per day in the first half of 2007 007 Symantec Internet Threat Report 4050-220-03 20081 15 Why am I a Target? • You are vulnerable (even with Windows Vista) • You have access to financial resources • You have access to information resources • You have access to network resources • A place – High-bandwidth connections – Botnets – To stash things – To anonymize – For surveillance – Personal confidential information – Employer confidential information – Lines of Credit – Bank Accounts 4050-220-03 20081 16 Botnets & Zombie PCs What is a botnet? – A large number of computers that have been compromised with remote control software – The botnet is then used to create and send out adware, spyware, spam, etc. – Patch regularly • Protect your computer 4050-220-03 20081 Botnet illustration. Retrieved 18 July 2007. www.symantec.com 17 But who and why? • Organized crime • Terrorists • Governments • Disgruntled employees • Customers • Hired guns • 1337 h4x0rz 4050-220-03 20081 18 FBI - MEECES Proposed motivations for hacker community by Profiling text • Money • Entertainment • Ego • Cause (ideology) • Entrance 4050-220-03 20081 19 It’s not just the Hackers! • Sony Digital Rights Management Rootkit 4050-220-03 20081 20 Profits "Last year was the first year that proceeds from cybercrime were greater than proceeds from the sale of illegal drugs, and that was, I believe, over $105 billion." - Valerie McNiven, US Treasury - Cybercrime Advisor, 2005 4050-220-03 20081 21 How Could I Become a Victim? Attacks are becoming increasingly complex —relying on a combination of techniques • Exploitation of Software Vulnerabilities & • • Improper Configuration Malicious Software/Malware Social Engineering Attacks 4050-220-03 20081 22 Security Basics - A Fire Hose Lecture QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. 4050-220-03 20081 23 What is Security? • Computer Security - generic name for the collection of tools designed to protect data and to thwart hackers • Network Security - measures to protect data during their transmission • Internet Security - measures to protect data during their transmission over a collection of interconnected networks 4050-220-03 20081 24 Services, Mechanisms, Attacks • need systematic way to define requirements • consider three aspects of information security: – – – security attack security mechanism security service • consider in reverse order 4050-220-03 20081 25 Security Service • is something that enhances the security of the • • • data processing systems and the information transfers of an organization intended to counter security attacks make use of one or more security mechanisms to provide the service replicate functions normally associated with physical documents – eg. have signatures, dates; need protection from disclosure, tampering, or destruction; be notarized or witnessed; be recorded or licensed 4050-220-03 20081 26 Security Mechanism • a mechanism that is designed to detect, • • prevent, or recover from a security attack no single mechanism that will support all functions required however one particular element underlies many of the security mechanisms in use: cryptographic techniques 4050-220-03 20081 27 Security Attack • any action that compromises the security of • • • information owned by an organization information security is about how to prevent attacks, or failing that, to detect attacks on information-based systems have a wide range of attacks note: often threat & attack mean same 4050-220-03 20081 28 Security Services • Authentication - assurance that the • • • • communicating entity is the one claimed Access Control - prevention of the unauthorized use of a resource Data Confidentiality – protection of data from unauthorized disclosure Data Integrity - assurance that data received is as sent by an authorized entity Non-Repudiation - protection against denial by one of the parties in a communication 4050-220-03 20081 29 Security Mechanisms • specific security mechanisms: – encipherment (cryptography), digital signatures, access controls, data integrity, authentication exchange, traffic padding, routing control, notarization – trusted functionality, security labels, event detection, security audit trails, security recovery • pervasive security mechanisms: 4050-220-03 20081 30 Classify Security Attacks as • passive attacks - eavesdropping on, or monitoring of, transmissions to: – obtain message contents, or – monitor traffic flows active attacks – modification of data stream to: – masquerade of one entity as some other – replay previous messages – modify messages in transit – denial of service 4050-220-03 20081 31 • Model for Network Security 4050-220-03 20081 32 Model for Network Security • using this model requires us to: – design a suitable algorithm for the security transformation – generate the secret information (keys) used by the algorithm – develop methods to distribute and share the secret information – specify a protocol enabling the principals to use the transformation and secret information for a security service 4050-220-03 20081 33 Questions & Comments 4050-220-03 20081 34 ...
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