Iss 310 Exam 1 - Points Awarded Points Missed Percentage...

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Points Awarded 42 Points Missed 8 Percentage 84% Lesson 1 1. Imagine that you are a cartographer and you've been asked to create a very detailed road map of Detroit. Based on what you know about the scale of maps, which of the following would best describe the map that you would create? A. large scale B. small scale Lesson 1, p. 4; Maps Unit, Map Scale Section Points Earned: 0/1 Correct Answer: A Your Response: B 2. What is a good clue from the landscape that the U.S. Public Land Survey System was used in a region? A. The circular shape of fields, due to central-pivot irrigation systems. B. The number of trees within a square mile. C. The pattern of the roads and farmland are usually square in shape. D. The number of buildings in a certain area. Lesson 1, p. 11 Points Earned: 1/1 Correct Answer: C Your Response: C 3. In the U.S. Public Land Survey, each section has an area of 1 square mile or _______. As a result, a quarter section has an area of _______. A. 820 hectares; 210 hectares B. 640 square kilometers; 160 kilometers C. 640 acres; 160 acres D. 1000 acres; 250 acres Lesson 1, p. 11 Points Earned: 1/1 Correct Answer: C Your Response: C 4. Large-scale maps, such as the map of the Sheffield area in England from the reference unit, show ___________ areas of the Earth. As a result, ________ detail can be shown on large-scale maps than on small-scale maps.
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A. relatively large; more B. very large; much less C. very small; less D. relatively small; more Lesson 1, p. 4 (from Map Unit, Map Scale section) Points Earned: 0/1 Correct Answer: D Your Response: B 5. The equator is an example of a great circle, which is defined as a circle drawn on the Earth that cuts it exactly in half. Answer Lesson 1, pp. 9-10 Points Earned: 1/1 Correct Answer: True Your Response: True 6. Characteristics about a place become "spatial information" when: A. they are connected to their absolute location on Earth. B. they are "observed" by a scientist or Geographer. C. they are recorded and entered into a computer. D. they are changed by the environment. Lesson 1, pp. 2-4 Points Earned: 0/1 Correct Answer: A Your Response: B 7. You learned that maps contain and portray a variety of spatial information about locations. What are the three ways spatial information can be represented on a map? A. in color, black/white, or both B. as points, lines, or polygons C. as symbols, lines, or areas D. as dots, lines, or areas Lesson 1, p. 4 (from Map Unit) Points Earned: 0/1 Correct Answer: B Your Response: D 8. What are the two questions that geographers ask?
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A. Why? and Who? B. Where? and Why there? C. Where? and When? D. Who? and What? Lesson 1, p. 2 Points Earned: 1/1 Correct Answer: B Your Response: B 9. What do geographers usually use maps for? A.
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course ISS 310 online taught by Professor Arbogast during the Summer '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Iss 310 Exam 1 - Points Awarded Points Missed Percentage...

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