Sound Devices, Rhyme and Metre.pdf - Poetry Phonetic Expressive Means Devices \u2022 are used to produce a certain acoustic(auditory effect \u2022 To give

Sound Devices, Rhyme and Metre.pdf - Poetry Phonetic...

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Poetry
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Phonetic Expressive Means/ Devices are used to produce a certain acoustic (auditory) effect To give emphasis to the utterance To arouse emotions in the reader or listener. In oral speech, intonation and stress are expressed directly by the speaker. In written speech they are conveyed indirectly by graphical expressive means and by a special syntactical arrangement of utterance
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Euphony Is such a combination of words and such an arrangement of utterance which produces a pleasing acoustic effect (aesthetics) Euphony is generally achieved by means of different sound devices as: alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia etc. rhythm and rhyme
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1. Alliteration is a phonetic stylistic device, which aims at imparting a melodic effect to the utterance by deliberate use of similar consonants in close succession is a conventional device of like most phonetic expressive devices, it doesn’t bear any lexical or other meaning, it is only a sort of musical accompaniment of the utterance
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Alliteration - Examples D oubting, d rea d ing, d reams no mortals ever d are d to d ream before (Poe). Is widely used in folklore, proverbs, sayings, traditional pairs of words: out of the f rying pan into the f ire; s afe and s ound; as f it as a f iddle; a p ig in a p oke; as b usy as a b ee How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
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Alliteration: used in prose - a strong melodic and emotional effect: The posse ss ive in st inc t never st ands st ill (Galsworthy) “Hear the music of voices, the s ong of a bird, the mighty s trains of an orchestra, as if you would be s tricken deaf tomorrow. Touch each object as if tomorrow your tactile s ense would fail. S mell the perfume of flowers…” - from “Three Days to See” by Helen Keller book titles: School for Scandal (R. Sheridan), Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility (J. Austen), Silver Spoon (J. Galsworthy).
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More poetry examples Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way, and that, she peers, and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees… -- Walter de la Mare, Silver The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees. The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas. The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor. And the highwayman came riding- Riding – riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door. -- Alfred Noyce, Highwayman
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Poetry: The d ay is col d and d ark and d reary It rains and the w ind is never w eary. --(Longfellow) She walks in beauty, like the night Of cl oudless cl imes and s tarry s kies; And all that’s b est of dark and b right Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which Heaven to gaudy d ay d enies.
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