master doc-1. prelim - #1 EIT: If two total sciences are...

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#1 EIT: If two total sciences are empirically equivalent (make the same predictions about observable phenomena), there can be no evidence to favor one over the other. Therefore, no knowledge of unobservables: For every theory T there are infinitely many conflicting theories which make the same predictions, but differ in what they say about unobservable phenomena. Cannot have evidence of one over the others because we do not have knowledge of unobservables. Formulate EIT for total sciences because: You need other parts (auxiliary hypothesis) in order to make any predictions. Ex. Newtonian Mech. do not make any predictions (by themselves) #2 CET: A crucial experiment can be run when two competing theories make different predictions about observable phenomena. When we have evidence favoring T over a competing theory T` (both total sciences) it is always because a crucial experiment has been run. EIT: If two theories make the same predictions about observable phenomena, there can be no evidence to favor one over the other. Why accepting CET leads to accepting EIT: If two theories are empirically equivalent (make the same predictions about observable phenomena), then a crucial experiment can not be run; we have no evidence favoring T over T`. Why CET is false: Essays address that even when a crucial experiment could be run, it often does not need to be. There are always infinite competing theories which make different predictions that can be ruled
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master doc-1. prelim - #1 EIT: If two total sciences are...

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