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EconomicsNP - August 2008 The Economics of Nuclear Power...

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The Economics of Nuclear Power August 2008
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For Institutional Investor Use Only. This article was reprinted with permission by World Nuclear Association. Note: Not all products, materials or services available at all firms. Advisors, please contact your home office. Shares are not FDIC insured, may lose value and have no bank guarantee. Shares are not individually redeemable and owners of the shares may acquire those shares from the Funds and tender those shares for redemption to the Funds in Creation Unit aggregations only, typically consisting of 100,000 shares. Invesco Aim Distributors, Inc. is the distributor of the PowerShares Exchange-Traded Fund Trust I, the PowerShares Exchange-Traded Fund Trust II, the PowerShares Actively Managed Exchange-Traded Fund Trust and the PowerShares India Exchange-Traded Fund Trust . PowerShares® is a registered trademark of Invesco PowerShares Capital Management LLC. Invesco PowerShares Capital Management LLC and Invesco Aim Distributors, Inc. are indirect, wholly owned subsidiaries of Invesco Ltd. Invesco Aim and Invesco PowerShares do not warrant or guarantee the information provided by World Nuclear Association and World Nuclear Association is not affiliated with Invesco Aim or Invesco PowerShares. An investor should consider the Funds’ investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses carefully before investing. For this and more complete information about the Funds call 800.983.0903 or visit the website www.invescopowershares.com for a prospectus. Please read the prospectus carefully before investing.
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1 The Economics of Nuclear Power Nuclear power is cost competitive with other forms of electricity generation, except where there is direct access to low-cost fossil fuels. Fuel costs for nuclear plants are a minor proportion of total generating costs, though capital costs are greater than those for coal-fired plants. In assessing the cost competitiveness of nuclear energy, decommissioning and waste disposal costs are taken into account. The relative costs of generating electricity from coal, gas and nuclear plants vary considerably depending on location. Coal is, and will probably remain, economically attractive in countries such as China, the USA and Australia with abundant and accessible domestic coal resources as long as carbon emissions are cost- free. Gas is also competitive for base-load power in many places, particularly using combined-cycle plants, though rising gas prices have removed much of the advantage. Nuclear energy is, in many places, competitive with fossil fuel for electricity generation, despite relatively high capital costs and the need to internalise all waste disposal and decommissioning costs. If the social, health and environmental costs of fossil fuels are also taken into account, nuclear is outstanding. See also the December 2005 World Nuclear Association report “
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EconomicsNP - August 2008 The Economics of Nuclear Power...

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