ECE320_Chapter_3 - 1-1ECE 320 Energy Conversion and Power...

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Unformatted text preview: 1-1ECE 320 Energy Conversion and Power Electronics Spring 2009 Instructor: Tim Hogan Chapter 3: Transformers (Textbook Chapter 2) Chapter Objectives In this chapter you will be able to: Choose the correct rating and characteristics of a transformer for a specific application Calculate the losses, efficiency, and voltage regulation of a transformer under specific operating conditions. Experimentally determine the transformer parameters given its ratings. Utilize the per unit system. 3.1 IntroductionTransformers do not have moving parts, nor are they energy conversion devices, however their ability to modify the current-voltage characteristics of a given load or source, make them invaluable components in energy conversion systems. They are utilized for power applications and in low power signal processing systems. One application in power transmission is the use of transformers on a transmission line utility pole commonly seen as a cylinder with a few wires sticking out. These wires enter the transformer through bushings that provide isolation between the wires and the tank. Inside the tank there is an iron core commonly made of silicon-steel laminations that are 14 mils (0.014) thick. The insulation often used is paper with the whole coil system immersed in insulating oil. The oil increases the dielectric strength of the paper and helps to transfer heat from the core/coil assembly. An drawing of one such distribution transformer is shown in Figure 2.2 in your textbook. Connection of the transformer to the transmission lines can take several electrical configurations. A relatively simple connection to a 2.4 kV three phase transmission line is shown in Figure 1. 2400 voltthree-phasethree-wire primary systemABC240024002400H1H2X1X2X3120 voltone-phasetwo-wire serviceFigure 1. Example configuration of a distribution pole transformer connection to three phase power lines to provide 120 (V) service to your home. 1-22400 voltthree-phasethree-wire primary systemABC240024002400H1H2X1X2X3120 (V)120 (V)240 (V)Figure 2. Example configuration of a distribution pole transformer connection to three phase power lines and provides 120 (V) and 240 (V) service. If a neutral line is also part of the three phase transmission line (perhaps between the substation and your home), then the connection could be made as shown in Figure 3. 4160Y/2400 voltthree-phasefour-wire Ywith neutralBC416041604160H1H2X1X3120 (V)120 (V)240 (V)ANN240024002400X2Figure 3. Distribution transformer connection to provide 120 (V) and 240 (V) service from a 4160Y/2400 (V) four-wire transmission line. 1-3For a three phase line at the service end, a system could be connected to a four wire three phase transmission line source as shown in Figure 4 below....
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2009 for the course ECE ECE320 taught by Professor Timhogan during the Spring '09 term at Michigan State University.

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ECE320_Chapter_3 - 1-1ECE 320 Energy Conversion and Power...

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