paranthroput and africanus

Paranthroput and - Courtney Peterson BAA 180S Ape/Human transition McCollum MA et al The Robust Australopithecine Face A Morphogenetic Perspective

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Courtney Peterson BAA 180S – Ape/Human transition McCollum, MA et al. The Robust Australopithecine Face: A Morphogenetic Perspective” Science 284, 301 (1999). Paranthropus and africanus The article for this week’s lesson was concerned with the three species of robust australopithecines: A. robustus of South Africa, A. aethiopicus of East Africa, and A. boisei . The three are called “robust” for a reason; much of their morphologies are dedicated to a robust structure, such as sagittal and nuchal crests, a robust mandible with a tall ramus, and a supraorbital torus. Because such features are not unique to robust australopithecines, it is difficult to determine which are independent and not a result of monophylogeny. Ultimately genes can solve this problem. While the genes of seemingly different species may indeed reflect the differences between them, developmental biology has shown that developmental pathways are homologous in the embryonic stages. Although such genes of the species in question are not
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2009 for the course BAA 180S taught by Professor Williams during the Fall '07 term at Duke.

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Paranthroput and - Courtney Peterson BAA 180S Ape/Human transition McCollum MA et al The Robust Australopithecine Face A Morphogenetic Perspective

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