exercise_2 - I in g Na+ g K+ C V 4) The current voltage...

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Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience 2004 Exercise # 2 1) Match these cellular elements to their equivalent circuit elements: Resistor Lipid bilayer Capacitor Ionic concentration gradient Battery Ion channel Voltage source Transmembrane voltage 2) Imagine this circuit. There is a switch that can be flipped to connect or disconnect the voltage source to the rest of the circuit. What is the total current flow across the “membrane” right after the switch is thrown? What about 1 year after the switch is thrown? Can you write the full equation for the current flow as a function of time? 3) What could you ever hope to understand by voltage-clamping a cell?
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Unformatted text preview: I in g Na+ g K+ C V 4) The current voltage relationship for a sodium ion channel is: I Na + = g Na + V E Na + ( ) The I-V curve of a sodium ion channel generated by a series of voltage-clamp experiments is below: Try to think about five things: a) Are there many sodium channels open when the voltage is very negative? b) When are about all of the sodium channels open? c) Why is the current negative for part of the curve? d) What is the reversal potential for sodium channels? e) For voltage clamps between about 10 mV and +40 mV, why does the current get progressively smaller? + I + V 40 mV-40 mV...
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exercise_2 - I in g Na+ g K+ C V 4) The current voltage...

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