ch10 summary & vocab

ch10 summary & vocab - Chapter 10 Approach-approach...

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Chapter 10
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Approach-approach conflict When a consumer who must choose between two attractive alternatives. Approach-avoidance conflict When a consumer facing a purchase choice with both positive and negative consequences. Attribution theory An approach to understanding the reasons consumers assign particular meanings to the behaviors of others. Avoidance-avoidance conflict A choice involving only undesirable outcomes. Benefit chain Where a product or brand is repeatedly shown to a consumer who names all the benefits that possession or use of the product might provide until the consumer can no longer identify additional benefits. Brand personality A set of human characteristics that become associated with a brand. Consumer ethnocentrism Reflects an individual difference in consumers' propensity to be biased against the purchase of foreign products. Demand The willingness to buy a particular product or service. Emotion Strong, relatively uncontrolled feelings that affect behavior. Five-Factor Model A multitrait theory used to identify five basic traits that are formed by genetics and early learning. Involvement A motivational state caused by consumer perceptions that a product, brand, or advertisement is relevant or interesting. Laddering A new projective technique used to construct a means-end or benefit chain. Latent motives Motives either unknown to the consumer or such that he was reluctant to admit them.
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Manifest motives Motives that are known and freely admitted. Maslow's hierarchy of needs Based on four premises: 1. All humans acquire a similar set of motives through genetic endowment and social interaction. 2. Some motives are more basic or critical than others. 3. The more basic motives must be satisfied to a minimum level before other motives are activated. 4. As the basic motives become satisfied, more advanced motives come into play. Means-end chain Where a product or brand is repeatedly shown to a consumer who names all the benefits that possession or use of the product might provide until the consumer can no longer identify additional benefits. Motivation
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2009 for the course MKT 3350 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Texas State.

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ch10 summary & vocab - Chapter 10 Approach-approach...

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