NSG6006 Study Guide (Payne, Kelly).docx - Policies Practice Standards \u2022 State Nurse Practice Act NSG6006 Study Guide 5000(Roles \u2022_History and

NSG6006 Study Guide (Payne, Kelly).docx - Policies Practice...

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Policies & Practice Standards • State Nurse Practice Act NSG6006 Study Guide 5000 (Roles) • _History and Developmental Aspects of Advanced Practice Nursing Definition of advanced practice nurse (APN) - A nurse who has completed an accredited graduate-level education program preparing her or him for the role of certified nurse practitioner, certified registered nurse anesthetist, certified nurse-midwife, or clinical nurse specialist; has passed a national certification examination that measures the APRN role and population-focused competencies; maintains continued competence as evidenced by recertification; and is licensed to practice as an APRN i nvolves advanced nursing knowledge and skills; it is not a medical practic e, although APNs perform expanded medical therapeutics in many roles History of APN movement History and evolution of nursing science Knowledge development APN Roles CNSs have a strong and tumultuous history. Over the past 20 years, the departure from direct patient care as being a main focus to working predominantly in the nursing education and systems improvement domains has created confusion within nursing and the public because non- CNSs (e.g., nurse educators, quality improvement managers) function in the same capacity. However, CNSs are uniquely educated to provide advanced practice and specialist expertise when working directly with complex and vulnerable patients, educating and supporting interdisciplinary staff, and facilitating change and innovation in health care systems that those in other roles in health care cannot. As health care reform continues to gain momentum to improve the health care system, there will be many new opportunities for CNSs. As masters of flexibility and creativity, CNSs can develop new roles to meet the needs of patients and health care systems . For example, in nurse- managed clinics, perhaps NPs could deliver the primary care to patients in the management of hypertension. Once first- or second-line therapies or interventions are found to be ineffective, a referral could be placed to the cardiovascular CNS for specialized pharmacologic and nonpharmacological treatment. Also, the cardiovascular CNS could integrate the latest evidence to create educational materials for patients and other health care professionals. Perhaps a CNM who is caring for a pregnant woman who develops gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and is in breech position could ask the perinatal CNS to commonage the patient by following the patient and fetus or neonate in the prenatal setting through hospital discharge into the postpartum phase. The perinatal CNS could establish interagency processes to facilitate care delivery across practice settings to provide seamless transitions of care. The possibilities are endless if CNSs understand their role, improve understanding of the importance of this role in advanced practice nursing, and maximize the driving forces and minimize the restraining forces in the health care system.
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