HIST222shortpaper1.docx - 1 American Military University The Jim Crow Alias and understanding what it meant for the South and North Dr Andre Key HIST

HIST222shortpaper1.docx - 1 American Military University...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

1American Military UniversityThe Jim Crow Alias and understanding what it meant for the South and NorthDr. Andre KeyHIST 222 African: American History after 187728 APRIL 2014
2Jim Crow; was it a person’s name, a law, or simply a figment of our imagination? The name is definitely a name that majority of the world knows, but what do we really know about Jim Crow? Small amounts of people assume he is a person, when others hear of his name they think of laws that come with it and some also think of him as a character. So, we ask ourselves which of them is it? If you are a believer of all three you are correct. Jim Crows foundation came from African American folk stories which quickly became tradition. It started “in the Yoruba culture of West Africa, he is a crow named “Jim”” (Blackface! Minstrel). The Crow was known to be an animal of deception or trickery who gave off the impression they were not the most intelligent of their species. They told stories of Jim Crow which when telling folktales it changes as time goes on but keeps the general Idea alive. There was a song that went along with the story called “Jump Jim Crow”. As slaves sang and dance to Jump Jim Crow the mindset was to make their masters seem as if they were Jim the Crow who knew of nothing. In reality several slaves learned how to read, write, and others knew of better ways to farm but did not inform their slave masters unless it benefited themselves which was uncommon in the south. Slaves sang the song while out in the field farming and put on theatrical events about “Jim” whenever they had time to spare. One day an aspiring white actor caught a glimpse of an African American man attempting to entertain while singing “Jump Jim Crow”. That actors name was Thomas Dartmouth Rice who took a holdof the Negro folktale and put his negative comedy spin on it. Rice “was one of the first performers to wear blackface makeup -- his skin was darkened with burnt cork” in order to portray a Negro (Pilgrim).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture