Lecture 3 - Constitution and Federalist Papers

Lecture 3 - Constitution and Federalist Papers - Lecture 3...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 3 The Constitution and Federalist Papers Political Science 104 Fall 2007
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
From the Articles of Confederation to the US Constitution Colonies – independent state legislatures, Crown-appointed Governor French and Indian War Expensive Taxation without Representation
Background image of page 2
Thomas Paine – Common Sense Cut ties with Britain Duty to overthrow tyrannical government Thomas Jefferson Freedom over Order
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
More a League of Friendship than a Federal Government Could not levy taxes Could not regulate commerce State sovereignty in independence State conflicts No national judicial system No executive position The Articles of Confederation
Background image of page 4
The Articles of Confederation were not working. They were not strong enough, and did not provide solutions to disagreements or allow fair progress. Shay’s Rebellion
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Annapolis Convention Constitutional Convention The founding fathers realized that the Articles of Confederation were not effective, but they were afraid of a strong government (corruption) and the loss of personal freedoms. Council of Revision – end of the Articles of Confederation
Background image of page 6
The Virginia Plan, the New Jersey Plan, and the Great Compromise Virginia Plan 2 houses of Congress, representation based on state population Lower house elected by the people, upper house elected by the lower house New Jersey Plan Single house of Congress, equal representation for each state, regardless of population Plural Executive – could be removed by legislature
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Connecticut Plan - The Great Compromise 2 houses of Congress, with the lower house (the
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/31/2008 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Hansen during the Spring '07 term at University of Wisconsin.

Page1 / 25

Lecture 3 - Constitution and Federalist Papers - Lecture 3...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online