First Aid ppt.ppt - FIRST AID Session Objectives Recognize...

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FIRST AID
Session Objectives: Recognize the benefits of obtaining first-aid and CPR certification Identify proper procedures for a variety of medical emergencies Assist in administering first aid when someone is injured Do no further harm
WHAT IS FIRST AID? is the provision of initial care for an illness or injury usually performed by non-expert, but trained personnel to a sick or injured person until definitive medical treatment can be accessed.
PURPOSE OF FIRST AID 1. To save life 2. To prevent further injury 3. To preserve vitality and resistance to infection
FIRST AID KIT Every office, factory, home and school should have an accessible first-aid box. It is readily available in shops but you can use a tin or card board box at home as your first aid box. Following are the common stuff you should have in your first aid box. Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes Small roll of absorbent gauze or gauze pads of different sizes Adhesive tape Triangular and roller bandages Cotton (1 roll) Band-aids (Plasters) Scissors Pen torch Latex gloves (2 pair) Tweezers Needle Moistened towels and clean dry cloth pieces. Antiseptic (Savlon or dettol) Thermometer Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant Assorted sizes of safety pins Cleansing agent/soap Non-prescription drugs Aspirin or paracetamol pain relievers Anti-diarrhea medication Antihistamine cream for Bee Stings Antacid (for stomach upset) Laxative
Help! Emergency! Minutes could make a difference
FOUR BASIC RULES: 1. Call for help immediately 2. Bring help to the victim 4. Do no further harm 3. Check the ABCs
Evaluate the scene Assess safety Prioritize care Check for medical alert tags Do head-to-toe check Move only if necessary Evaluate the scene Assess safety Prioritize care Check for medical alert tags Do head-to-toe check Move only if necessary Assess the Scene Assess the Scene
CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSC ITATION (CPR): FIRST A ID Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including a heart attack or near drowning, in which someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. The American Heart Association recommends that everyone untrained bystanders and medical personnel alike — begin CPR with chest compressions. It's far better to do something than to do nothing at all if you're fearful that your knowledge or abilities aren't 100 percent complete. Remember, the difference between your doing something and doing nothing could be someone's life.
Here's advice from the American Heart Association: Untrained. If you're not trained in CPR, then provide hands- only CPR. That means uninterrupted chest compressions of 100 to 120 a minute until paramedics arrive (described in more detail below). You don't need to try rescue breathing.

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