Food_addiction_stories_of_teens_and_twenties_in_recovery-final_12_0801_readonly.pdf

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Food Addiction Stories of Teens and Twenties in Recovery Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers a solution for all forms of food addiction. Many people are finding recovery in FA from obesity, undereating, bulimia, and obsession with food. There are no dues or fees; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.
2 | Is food making you miserable? Do you feel ashamed about your behavior with food? Do you overeat or starve yourself? Do you purge, exercise, or use laxatives to get rid of food? Do you feel separated from your friends because of your behavior with food? Are you getting in trouble at home or at school because of sneaking food or hiding the way you eat? Do you find yourself counting calories or planning your next diet during class? Do you steal money for food? Do you feel that if only you had a different body, your life would be okay? When you eat, are you filled with self-hatred because you can’t control yourself? Do you feel depressed? Do you feel hopeless? YOU ARE NOT ALONE. We are people in our teens and twenties who have been where you are. In this pamphlet, you will read about our struggles with food and the suffering it brought us—and about how we found a common solution in Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), a Twelve-Step program for food addiction. Whether you have five pounds to lose or 200, whether you are bulimic or anorexic or simply defeated by your struggles with food and body image, you are not alone. There is help and hope—and a long-term solution— in FA.
| 3 I was willing to do anything to be in a thin body and be happy. A s far back as I can remember, I have always gotten a “high” from eating sugar or flour products and quantities of food. I felt a lot of shame around food. I stole and hid food and often lied about how much I had eaten. I matured physically at an early age and was bigger than my peers. I always had a feeling of being different and never felt comfortable in my own skin. When I entered high school, my peers caught up to me in physical maturity, but I was still bigger. I real- ized I was fat and could not control the way I ate. I tried to diet but could not do it. The little hope I had vanished. When I was 18, I was at my heaviest weight and more depressed than ever. I was willing to do anything to be in a thin body and be happy. A friend of mine told me of a Twelve-Step program for people who had problems with food. I had heard of how the Twelve Steps worked for alcoholics. I felt I was an alcoholic with food, so I attended a meeting. For the first time in my life, I heard people tell- ing my story. I had hope that there was a way of living that could work for me, so I stuck around.

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